Montblanc is a household name for pens and luxury leather goods, and they plan to be just as well known in the future for fine watches made by master craftsmen. Time+Tide has partnered with Montblanc in this exciting new chapter of their story, which includes watches more than ever before. Read all the latest news and in-depth reviews here.

Watches by movement: 5 watches powered with an SW200 from divers to dress

As far as ubiquitous movements go, the SW200 and its variants is one to make your eyes light up when you see it on a specification sheet. Originally a clone of the ever-loved ETA 2824, once the patent had expired, Sellita’s version remains just as reliable, affordable and well-performing as its ETA twin. The 4Hz beat rate, 38 hour power reserve and moderate 4.6mm thickness makes it a great all-rounder movement for any watches that can house it. Here are five great examples… Montblanc 1858 Automatic The SW200 is no stranger to luxury treatment, being disguised here as the calibre MB 24.15 in this Montblanc 1858 Automatic — probably one of the best exploration-themed watches of the modern era. The smoked-blue fumé dial combined with the silver steel case and crisp white highlights evoke the feeling of a snow-swept mountain, as depicted by the instantly recognisable Montblanc logo. The thin, rotating compass bezel just adds to the vintage charm of the 40mm watch, as do the printed minute markers and large cathedral hands. Offering 100m of water resistance, this watch can handle the most intrepid adventure, while the 20mm lug width ensures you can put it on an adventure-ready alternative… Read More

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How do you like these apples? The best green dial watches of 2020, Part 1, including Longines, IWC and Seiko

YES, we love colours! Why do we drop Instagram comments peppered with flame emojis for a Breitling or Mido rainbow dial, and yet still find ourselves at home with a monochrome dive watch, a monochrome moon watch, a black Casi-Oak and maybe, to get hog wild, a blue dial sports watch? B-o-r-i-n-g. Do what you say and go green, the colour of the year, whether it be olive toughness or bottle green in a svelte gold case. Do not be shy of wrist, and spice up that wardrobe with a pick from this verdant basket of goodness as we look at some of the best green dial watches of 2020.  Longines Legend Diver bronze with green dial The Legend Diver in 42mm is as vintage perfect as they come, yet is less spoken of these days than some flashier divers of 2020. In its strict monochrome early ’60s suit, the inner bezel compressor case is more subdued and formal, but here it changes dramatically with the new bronze case, with a deep forest green dégradé dial to match gold tones. The detailed gold-coloured print on the dial is sharp, and rich against the dial. In this 42mm case, the warmth… Read More

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VIDEO: Don’t take Montblanc seriously as a watch brand? You might want to check out two of the 2020 models

Montblanc have been building their watch credentials over the last few years under the steady hand of Davide Cerrato, the Managing Director of Watches since 2015. With three distinct collections under his influence — the 1858, Heritage and Star Legacy — Montblanc watches have gone from strength to strength over the last half-decade, with 2020 being a particularly strong collection. Here we break down a few of the highlights from this most recent collection, taking a closer look at how each piece within the collection has developed over the last few years, and how that journey has impacted the watches we see this year. Specifically in the spotlight was the Montblanc 1858 Geosphere, a watch that has seen several different expressions, including in bronze and on Bund straps, but this year, for the first time, we see it with a remarkable gradient blue dial. To top it off, the latest Geosphere is also available on a bi-metal beads-of-rice bracelet that uses both titanium and steel, an unusual combination that blends the robust versatility of titanium with the gleaming heft of steel. The Heritage Automatic in British Racing Green strikes a chord, as though green and yellow gold watches aren’t rare, the… Read More

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Watches by movement: 5 watches powered with an SW200 from divers to dress

As far as ubiquitous movements go, the SW200 and its variants is one to make your eyes light up when you see it on a specification sheet. Originally a clone of the ever-loved ETA 2824, once the patent had expired, Sellita’s version remains just as reliable, affordable and well-performing as its ETA twin. The 4Hz beat rate, 38 hour power reserve and moderate 4.6mm thickness makes it a great all-rounder movement for any watches that can house it. Here are five great examples… Montblanc 1858 Automatic The SW200 is no stranger to luxury treatment, being disguised here as the calibre MB 24.15 in this Montblanc 1858 Automatic — probably one of the best exploration-themed watches of the modern era. The smoked-blue fumé dial combined with the silver steel case and crisp white highlights evoke the feeling of a snow-swept mountain, as depicted by the instantly recognisable Montblanc logo. The thin, rotating compass bezel just adds to the vintage charm of the 40mm watch, as do the printed minute markers and large cathedral hands. Offering 100m of water resistance, this watch can handle the most intrepid adventure, while the 20mm lug width ensures you can put it on an adventure-ready alternative… Read More

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10 watches from Montblanc’s 2020 collection that suggest they are reaching the top of the mountain

When Richemont acquired Minerva to pair with Montblanc to fast-track legitimacy for their watchmaking division, some scoffed at the audacity. Taking a respected, historical watchmaker and giving their patents to a pen brand seemed like horological heresy at the time; however, Montblanc’s commitment to continuing Minerva’s legacy only grows more apparent with each subsequent year of new releases. Burgeoning respect from all, even the naysayers, is happening. For 2020’s online edition of Watches & Wonders, Montblanc have updated their collections to include 10 novel designs, ranging from subtle dial changes to bombastic antique re-imaginings. Heritage Collection While Montblanc’s 21st century merger with Minerva has given them access to a plethora of unique complications and designs, the Heritage Collection honours the more restrained timepieces from the ’40s and ’50s, evoking the post-war boom of prosperity and optimism. Two chronographs make up the three new models. The Heritage Monopusher Chronograph isn’t just salmon-dialled, its dial is subtly sectioned into rings of sunburst brushing and grainy stippling. Black rhodium coats the indices and hands, granting a soft contrast that doesn’t jut out too much. As with each of the new Heritage models, the bent lugs and curved spring bars help reduce the 42mm… Read More

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HANDS-ON: The Montblanc Heritage Automatic 

Normally in these hands-on reviews I leave the sticky question of the price until the end. But this time around I’m putting it front and centre. This Montblanc Heritage Automatic has an Australian RRP of $3410. And for that amount of coin, you get a lot of watch.  The steel case is well-sized — 40mm across and 11.65mm high, with 20mm lugs packing a really nice grey croc strap with a slight sfumato effect. The lines of this case err, as the heritage name would suggest, towards the more classic in style. Fairly simple construction, a mirror polish, and pleasing, swooping lugs. The movement is a third-party number, reliable, but nothing too exciting, which is why the brand has opted to hide it away behind a nicely engraved picture of the Montblanc, née Minerva, facility in Villeret. It’s worth noting that the caseback is about as close as this watch got to that building, which is strictly the domain of their top-tier pieces — this watch was assembled in the brand’s Le Locle facility.  The dial, though, that’s something else. The salmon colour is on-trend for 2019, and very much the right choice for this three-handed heritage offering. Really, though,… Read More

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Why a man of style loves the Montblanc 1858 Automatic Dual Time

Montblanc 1858 Automatic Dual Time

Editor’s note: This is a throwback to the time we chatted to one of the best-looking blokes in Melbourne about his (then) new Montblanc 1858 Automatic Dual Time. As Sam predicted, he didn’t think this would be a watch that would look dated as the years passed, and he was right — the classic proportions, the cathedral hands and warmth from the bronze bezel all contribute to a sense of timelessness. The Montblanc 1858 Collection was launched in 2015, and the heritage styling of the family of watches has endured to their latest releases at SIHH 2019, with bronze cues also remaining as a motif. Though he’s had it for a few years now, it’s hard to imagine that Montblanc isn’t still taking up a good portion of Sam’s wrist real estate.  We don’t want to blow Sam’s cover, because My Watch Story subjects are guaranteed a high degree of anonymity. But let’s just say, Sam might not have ever seen you, but if you’re partial to a wide, wide range of clothing brands – most recently UNIQLO – you will probably have seen him. However, it’s not his photogenic features in the frame today, it’s his no less photo-friendly wrist… Read More

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