Montblanc is a household name for pens and luxury leather goods, and they plan to be just as well known in the future for fine watches made by master craftsmen. Time+Tide has partnered with Montblanc in this exciting new chapter of their story, which includes watches more than ever before. Read all the latest news and in-depth reviews here.

HANDS-ON: The Montblanc Heritage Automatic 

Normally in these hands-on reviews I leave the sticky question of the price until the end. But this time around I'm putting it front and centre. This Montblanc Heritage Automatic has an Australian RRP of $3410. And for that amount of coin, you get a lot of watch.  The steel case is well-sized — 40mm across and 11.65mm high, with 20mm lugs packing a really nice grey croc strap with a slight sfumato effect. The lines of this case err, as the heritage name would suggest, towards the more classic in style. Fairly simple construction, a mirror polish, and pleasing, swooping lugs. The movement is a third-party number, reliable, but nothing too exciting, which is why the brand has opted to hide it away behind a nicely engraved picture of the Montblanc, née Minerva, facility in Villeret. It's worth noting that the caseback is about as close as this watch got to that building, which is strictly the domain of their top-tier pieces — this watch was assembled in the brand's Le Locle facility.  The dial, though, that's something else. The salmon colour is on-trend for 2019, and very much the right choice for this three-handed heritage offering. Really, though,… Read More

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Why a man of style loves the Montblanc 1858 Automatic Dual Time

Montblanc 1858 Automatic Dual Time

Editor's note: This is a throwback to the time we chatted to one of the best-looking blokes in Melbourne about his (then) new Montblanc 1858 Automatic Dual Time. As Sam predicted, he didn't think this would be a watch that would look dated as the years passed, and he was right — the classic proportions, the cathedral hands and warmth from the bronze bezel all contribute to a sense of timelessness. The Montblanc 1858 Collection was launched in 2015, and the heritage styling of the family of watches has endured to their latest releases at SIHH 2019, with bronze cues also remaining as a motif. Though he's had it for a few years now, it's hard to imagine that Montblanc isn't still taking up a good portion of Sam's wrist real estate.  We don't want to blow Sam's cover, because My Watch Story subjects are guaranteed a high degree of anonymity. But let's just say, Sam might not have ever seen you, but if you're partial to a wide, wide range of clothing brands – most recently UNIQLO – you will probably have seen him. However, it's not his photogenic features in the frame today, it's his no less photo-friendly wrist… Read More

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VIDEO: The 2019 Montblanc 1858 releases go back to nature 

When Montblanc's 1858 collection burst onto the scene back in 2015 it heralded a bold new direction for the brand, adding a no-nonsense, outdoorsy sensibility to what had, until that point, been a fairly buttoned-up collection of watches.  Since that initial drop, the 1858 has gone from strength to strength, and their 2019 slate of releases was particularly cohesive, and attractive. For me, the core collection can be summed up in three, thematically linked watches, all limited editions, that have taken the brand back to nature, with their earthy bronze cases and lush, dark green dials.  There's the 1858 Automatic LE, the 1858 Chronograph LE and the 1858 Geosphere LE. For all that these watches have different  functions, they're all bound by a strong, and 100 per cent on-trend look of bronze cases with dark green dials. Montblanc 1858 Geosphere LE Visually, this is the watch out of the three with the most going on, dial-wise. Fundamentally, it's a dual time watch — the second zone is shown at nine, and there are big, dynamic maps of both hemispheres, which function as day/night indicators and even — if your geography is strong — a world time readout. It's a big,… Read More

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HANDS-ON: The Montblanc Heritage Automatic 

Normally in these hands-on reviews I leave the sticky question of the price until the end. But this time around I'm putting it front and centre. This Montblanc Heritage Automatic has an Australian RRP of $3410. And for that amount of coin, you get a lot of watch.  The steel case is well-sized — 40mm across and 11.65mm high, with 20mm lugs packing a really nice grey croc strap with a slight sfumato effect. The lines of this case err, as the heritage name would suggest, towards the more classic in style. Fairly simple construction, a mirror polish, and pleasing, swooping lugs. The movement is a third-party number, reliable, but nothing too exciting, which is why the brand has opted to hide it away behind a nicely engraved picture of the Montblanc, née Minerva, facility in Villeret. It's worth noting that the caseback is about as close as this watch got to that building, which is strictly the domain of their top-tier pieces — this watch was assembled in the brand's Le Locle facility.  The dial, though, that's something else. The salmon colour is on-trend for 2019, and very much the right choice for this three-handed heritage offering. Really, though,… Read More

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4 bronze watches you may have missed from $700 to $7000, including Zelos, Bell & Ross and Montblanc

The use of bronze as a case material in watchmaking has surpassed trend to establish itself as a mainstay. Certain bronzed, beautiful models have achieved legend status, such as the Panerai Bronzo, the OG of modern bronze watches, but just as many go undiscovered and unheralded – we compiled a quartet of very different offerings, from big and square, to a very cool indie execution from an Asian-based brand, to the extremely odd pairing of bronze with ceramic. All watches are taken from our recent Buying Guide, which you can access free, and in full, here. Zelos Mako 500 Singapore-based Zelos Watches are a prime example of why microbrands matter, by using unusual materials like carbon fibre, meteorite and, in this case, bronze. The brand offers great quality at a more than reasonable price. That's evident here, with a wavy radial patterned dial that adds visual depth and reminds you that this diver is good for 500 metres. Case size 40mm Case material CuSn8 Bronze Movement SW200 Price $799 USD Bell & Ross BR 03-92 Diver Bronze In 2017, Bell & Ross caused a splash and introduced their first ever square cased dive watch. This year they've done it again,… Read More

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VIDEO: 5 outstanding Montblanc watches from SIHH 2019

Since Davide Cerrato took the gig as Montblanc's top watch guy, the brand's timepiece offerings have been steadily ramping up, becoming more focused and more appealing. To my mind, Montblanc's SIHH 2019 saw the brand in high gear, on the inside track and with the intensity of a winner. Two hero collections and a range of watches to appeal to a wide range of tastes. Here are our five picks. Montblanc 1858 Geosphere LE Last year's complicated two timer was already a good-looking beast of a watch, and this year the Geosphere's gone green, making it even more Hulk-like. Montblanc 1858 Chronograph While it might not have the same incredible engine as its Minerva brethren, the 1858 Chronograph, with its bronze case and mossy green dial, is one undeniably attractive piece of kit. Montblanc Heritage Automatic While the 1858 family was all about the green, the freshly minted Heritage line is looking dapper with its copper-y salmon colourways. Add to that the complex dial construction and you've got a winning proposition on your hands. Montblanc Heritage Perpetual Calendar Montblanc's meteoric re-emergence into serious watchmaking was its aggressively priced QP. Since then, it's become a staple of the collection, and this… Read More

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HANDS-ON: Salmon stunner, the Montblanc Heritage Pulsograph

When Montblanc gave us a privileged preview of its new Heritage collection in Miami back in October, our gut told us that they had a winner in the salmon-dialled Heritage Pulsograph. Forward three months to SIHH: 36 exhibiting brands and I-don't-know-how-many-hundreds of new watches later, our opinion is, if anything, stronger than ever. With the Heritage Pulsograph's immaculately judged balance of good looks, technical content, quality of execution and price, Montblanc has hit the nail on the head. First, let's talk aesthetics: vintage-inspired watches have been a thing for some years now – and thanks to its head of watches, Davide Cerrato, Montblanc is a shining example of how to do it right. (Cerrato has previous form, as you may know, having harnessed Tudor's archives to transform it from also-ran to super-cool brand half a decade ago.) At Montblanc, he has the rich archives of Minerva to draw on – and the Heritage Pulsograph is very similar to a 1940s Minerva monopusher chrono. But it's no slavish copy. We were able to line up both watches together and, on the new model, the lines of the case and lugs are cleaner, the surfaces flatter, giving the whole watch a more contemporary… Read More

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