Tissot has been making fine Swiss watches since 1853, but theirs is a story of pushing boundaries as well as past mastery. Tissot's range of watches runs from classic styles to the very latest in touch-screen technical innovation. Come on the journey as Time+Tide roadtest and review Tissot watches, new and old.

EVENT: Watches, whisky, Brownlows – Tissot hosts 6 of the best for AFL’s big night

Last night the Australian Football League (AFL) celebrated its night of nights, the Brownlow Medal. Regarded as one of the most important events on the Australian sporting calendar, it’s akin to American Football’s Heisman Trophy or the world game’s Ballon d’Or. Needless to say, it’s kind of a big deal around these parts. Especially (at least for us) when there are watches involved. At an intimate event held just prior to the players’ stroll down the red carpet, Tissot welcomed six of the league’s best to their Brownlow Suite at the Crown Towers Crystal Villa room — fitting each one with a new model from their collection, as they took part in an exclusive tasting of the World’s Best Single Malt Whisky, sourced from Australia’s own Sullivans Cove Distillery and valued at $11,000 a bottle. Co-hosting the event was Hawthorn midfielder Tom Mitchell, who walked into the event as the heavy Brownlow favourite after an impressive season that saw him average 35.3 disposals a game, with a record-breaking 848 on-field possessions for the season. To no one’s surprise, and with 28 votes, he strolled out with the Charlie around his neck, and Tissot’s dressy Chemin des Tourelles Powermatic 80 on… Read More

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ANNOUNCING: New in the shop, the handsome AF Tissot Heritage Petite Seconde and why we rate it

This morning we are announcing a new addition to the Time+Tide shop — the Tissot Heritage Petite Seconde, see the listing here. Tissot’s heritage game has been unimpeachable the last few years, with the Heritage 1948 causing quite a stir last year, and the solid, tidy and classic Petite Seconde making 2018 a one-two punch. Perhaps the central argument for these pieces, which reflect the depth of the brand’s 165-odd year archive, is the value proposition. They have style, they have movements found in more expensive brands’ watches — so there’s a big tick there in bang for buck — and they have the all-important Swiss-made provenance. Like most people in watchland, we rate them. Always have. Here are a few reasons why we’ve chosen to offer the Heritage Petite Seconde in the Time+Tide shop, with highlights of the watch from our main man Felix Scholz’s review last week: 1. It’s a flat out looker, and the case size at 42mm is right The case is refined and dressy, full of pleasing curves, giving it a warm, pebble-like feeling. The crystal is a nicely domed sapphire, held in place by a narrow, polished bezel that proves some contrast to the case middle and… Read More

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IN-DEPTH: The Tissot Heritage Petite Seconde 

The story in a second: Tissot’s latest heritage release is another hit. In these days of the never-ending vintage revival, it seems that every brand has to have a heritage collection, regardless of whether they have any actual heritage. That’s not a problem Tissot has to deal with, as the brand dates way back to 1853, a depth of history that’s reflected in the strength of their current heritage lineup. The latest member is this handsome fella, the Tissot Heritage Petite Seconde, a hand-winding hero based on a 1943 design, which is entirely suited to the modern day. The dial There’s an interesting story about this reissue, and it centres on one word on the dial. The Heritage Petite Seconde is a tribute to an antimagnetic watch from 1943. When the watch was originally shown at Baselworld this year it featured a line of text reading ‘antimagnetique’ under the wonderfully retro, sweeping Tissot logo. As you can see, that word is no longer there, likely because, while the watch was antimagnetic 70 or so years ago, technology has moved on, and it wouldn’t be accurate to call the watch antimagnetic by modern standards. And so, now that the watch is… Read More

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EVENT: Watches, whisky, Brownlows – Tissot hosts 6 of the best for AFL’s big night

Last night the Australian Football League (AFL) celebrated its night of nights, the Brownlow Medal. Regarded as one of the most important events on the Australian sporting calendar, it’s akin to American Football’s Heisman Trophy or the world game’s Ballon d’Or. Needless to say, it’s kind of a big deal around these parts. Especially (at least for us) when there are watches involved. At an intimate event held just prior to the players’ stroll down the red carpet, Tissot welcomed six of the league’s best to their Brownlow Suite at the Crown Towers Crystal Villa room — fitting each one with a new model from their collection, as they took part in an exclusive tasting of the World’s Best Single Malt Whisky, sourced from Australia’s own Sullivans Cove Distillery and valued at $11,000 a bottle. Co-hosting the event was Hawthorn midfielder Tom Mitchell, who walked into the event as the heavy Brownlow favourite after an impressive season that saw him average 35.3 disposals a game, with a record-breaking 848 on-field possessions for the season. To no one’s surprise, and with 28 votes, he strolled out with the Charlie around his neck, and Tissot’s dressy Chemin des Tourelles Powermatic 80 on… Read More

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VIDEO: One of the greats – the Tissot Visodate

Here at Time+Tide we spend a goodly amount of time talking about the latest watch releases. Well, this isn’t one of those times. Instead, today we’re talking about a stone-cold classic that’s as good today as when it was first released – the Tissot Visodate. The Visodate is an historical reissue of a mid-century watch that was novel for its inclusion of – wait for it – the mighty (and occasionally maligned) date window. While these days the date is de rigueur, it’s easy to forget that back in the day it was a big deal. The re-release honours the original not just in the snazzy name but also with a date display that’s deliberate in its style and placement. For me, though, the charm of the Visodate extends well beyond this complication. The case shape, the opaline dial finish, the arrowhead markers. All perfectly on point for a dressy vintage classic. And this version on a Milanese mesh strap only adds to the old-school charm. All this for under $1000 – it’s hard to go wrong. Tissot Heritage Visodate Automatic Australian pricing Tissot Heritage Visodate, steel on mesh, $900

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VIDEO: The Tissot Swissmatic – a great entry into the world of mechanical watches

This video is all about value. Not only do you get two watch reviews (we’re covering Tissot’s dressy Everytime Swissmatic as well as the sportier V8 Swissmatic), but both watches represent a solid value proposition. The style of these two watches is a pretty by-the-book interpretation of daily dress/sport, depending on which flavour you plumb for, but the Swissmatic movements are something else. Based on the revolutionary Sistem51 from Swatch, the Swissmatics share the same fundamental specs and architecture, but benefit from a more robust — and a completely automated – build. These watches might not have the high finishing that Justin extolled in his recent piece, but they possess an industrial charm all their own, and are, I think, a great way to get into the joys of a mechanical watch. A Swiss one at that. Tissot Swissmatic Australian pricing Tissot Everytime Swissmatic, $725, Tissot V8 Swissmatic $650

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VIDEO: Is the Tissot Seastar 1000 Powermatic 80 the best-value diver of 2018? 

This is such a great watch. Honestly. I can’t think of many (if any) Swiss-made watches that offer such a punchy package for this sort of price. Not only do you get the impressive Powermatic 80 movement (more than three days of power reserve rocks) in a good-looking, well-made 300m diver, you get nice little features like the gradient dial and ceramic bezel. So much win. On top of that, it fits great on the wrist: 43mm is big, but not obnoxiously so, especially when paired with the height. Even the dial text and date placement is done right. My only possible quibble is the strap. Not the rubber strap itself, which I quite like — Tissot ‘T’ motif and all — no, it’s the slightly odd 21mm width. Given that I’m the kind of guy who likes chopping and changing straps as often as my mood, the uncommon width is a little bit of a buzzkill. But then, for the price, it’s hard to be too harsh with this little gem. Tissot Seastar 1000 Powermatic 80 Australian pricing Tissot Seastar 1000 Powermatic 80, steel on rubber, $1000

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