The relationship between Tudor and Australia stretches back to the 1940s – there’s a good chance your father or even grandfather has a watch bearing the distinctive rose or shield logo. But as the brand commences an exciting renaissance, it’s time for the second chapter in the Australian Tudor story. Time+Tide are honoured to partner with Tudor as they win over a new generation of watch lovers.

Ready, set, GO! The top 5 sports watches of Watches & Wonders

top 5 sports watches

This is turning out to be a year of stark contrasts. While some manufacturers insist on microscopic adjustments to tried and trusted case sizes and materials, the flipside of the horological coin is marked by bravado. A bravado in contrasts, from flashing neon sun-yellow ceramic to the demure elegance of brushed silver. Never has our diverse taste been served with such deliciously varied dishes that offer hints of a strong recovery after a dark year.  In one of the most hotly contested categories, my thoughts on the top 5 sports watches of Watches & Wonders show this to full effect. Hublot Big Bang Unico Yellow Magic Don’t be wrist-shy. Why wear an understated, black dial watch, when you can rock the cocktail party (a rocktail party?) with a SMASH of bright yellow? It’s not small, but this time it is a calmer 42mm, well as calm as you can get with a chunky yellow sun strapped to your wrist. What this is, aside from being traditional Swiss craftsmanship inside a very loud suit, is a mind-transforming device: the Hublot Big Bang Unico Yellow Magic will override any trace of negativity that resides within your body and imbue you with a… Read More

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The top 5 chronographs of Watches & Wonders 2021

Given the disruptive effects of the pandemic upon watch manufacturers, it’s understandable that some are now cagey about taking too many big risks. At this year’s Watches & Wonders, many brands chose to expand on their design languages without pushing things too far and the results are some truly refined watches. But whether it be bright colours, vintage reissues or revolutionary engineering, the one certainty is the chronograph remains as popular a complication as ever. Here’s my pick of the top 5 chronographs of Watches & Wonders 2021. IWC Pilot’s Watch Chronograph 41 As ubiquitous as the Flieger style may be to a watch enthusiast’s eye, there’s still a lot to get excited about when it comes to the IWC Pilot’s Watch Chronograph 41. While it’s renowned legibility may once have been attributed to its size, the reduced case diameter from 43mm to 41mm maintains its ease-of-reading with bold Arabic numerals and aggressive sword hands. With added practicality in the form of quick-release straps and bracelets, and an improved 100m of water resistance, the Pilot’s Watch Chronograph 41 is as functional as it is beautiful, in either luscious blue or green dials. Price: $6,500 USD on rubber/leather and $7,200 USD on… Read More

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Top collectors react to the leftfield Tudor Black Bay 58 in 18K gold. Would they buy it?

Tudor Black Bay 58 18K

Recently I published my thoughts on the new Tudor Black Bay 58 18K in yellow gold. Tudor really surprised us all this year at Watches & Wonders, throwing their hat in the ring for the higher price tier of precious-metal watches. Personally I think the watch is stunning, but nothing is perfect. I would have liked to have seen the polished surfaces and bevels remain on the case, in favor of its new all satin-brushed surface. And while I think it’s neat the watch has a sapphire caseback, part of me would have preferred the extra bit of gold. The MT5400 inside, while no ugly duckling, is not necessarily a gorgeous Geneva Hallmark caliber. The other issue at hand is its $16,800 USD retail pricing, which some are finding a bit steep – it’s approximately five times more than the stainless-steel models. Tudor is usually associated with value-driven offerings, not the high price tags of precious-metal luxury, so it will be interesting to see how it permeates the mass marketplace. Feeling slightly conflicted, I decided to reach out to some celebrated members of the watch community to see what their initial reactions to the watch were and whether its price… Read More

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Ready, set, GO! The top 5 sports watches of Watches & Wonders

top 5 sports watches

This is turning out to be a year of stark contrasts. While some manufacturers insist on microscopic adjustments to tried and trusted case sizes and materials, the flipside of the horological coin is marked by bravado. A bravado in contrasts, from flashing neon sun-yellow ceramic to the demure elegance of brushed silver. Never has our diverse taste been served with such deliciously varied dishes that offer hints of a strong recovery after a dark year.  In one of the most hotly contested categories, my thoughts on the top 5 sports watches of Watches & Wonders show this to full effect. Hublot Big Bang Unico Yellow Magic Don’t be wrist-shy. Why wear an understated, black dial watch, when you can rock the cocktail party (a rocktail party?) with a SMASH of bright yellow? It’s not small, but this time it is a calmer 42mm, well as calm as you can get with a chunky yellow sun strapped to your wrist. What this is, aside from being traditional Swiss craftsmanship inside a very loud suit, is a mind-transforming device: the Hublot Big Bang Unico Yellow Magic will override any trace of negativity that resides within your body and imbue you with a… Read More

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Hey, wait, so this Tudor Black Bay 58 is silver not steel? What differences are there, then?

Tudor Black Bay 58 925

When you think of Tudor watches, you typically think of stainless-steel, value-driven offerings. But Tudor surprised us all, making the leap to yellow gold as well as silver for the Tudor Black Bay 58. While the Tudor Black 58 18K presents a formidable step up in price, the new Tudor Black Bay 58 925 in silver remains approachably priced for a Black Bay 58 diver. Personally, I applaud Tudor’s innovation and the fact they took the familiar BB58 design and shaped it into new metals – for both the collection and the brand. But I am left wondering how well silver, as a case metal, will hold up during daily wear. A quick rundown of the Tudor Black Bay 58 925 ref. 79010 The Tudor Black Bay 58 925 retains the 39mm case diameter the BB58 is known for, its creation both harking back to their vintage divers as well as creating an opportunity for those who like to wear more classic diameters on their wrists. Upon the initial release of the Black Bay 58, it was lauded for taming the dimensions of a Black Bay diver and for creating a novelty closer in proportions (particularly its thickness) to what… Read More

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INTRODUCING: Tudor’s Black Bay Chonograph hits the sweet spot between the Speedmaster and Daytona

Tudor Black Bay Chronograph

The new, all-steel Tudor Black Bay Chronograph seems to me like the sweet middle ground between two iconic watches.  I have a strained relationship with the Rolex Daytona – not that I can get one at retail – and feel it’s a bit too loud and well, Rolexy, even if I admire the quality. The Omega Speedmaster, on the other hand, is burdened by its own history. While I love it, I feel it’s a bit flat and floaty on the wrist and would rather have one of the bicompax-versions but they’re big and not “the Moonwatch”. Luckily, Tudor seemed to have been listening to my internal dilemma. The brand took me by surprise with this slightly updated case and not one, but TWO fresh panda dials with matching bezels. Damn. With a slightly redesigned case a touch slimmer but still 41mm, the lugs seem better proportioned, still beefy, still with a very much Rolex family quality to the razor-sharp bevels along the flanks. The riveted delight of a bracelet remains, as does the cheeky choice of a bund or  a woven Jaquard fabric strap. The black aluminium bezel tidies up the overall tough look, and does put it closer… Read More

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ANALYSIS: Gold Tudors are now selling but who exactly will be buying?

Tudor Black Bay 58 18K

Yesterday it is fair to say that Tudor hit a home run with their releases, notably introducing an attractive duo of precious metal Black Bay 58 watches as well as a revamped pair of panda-dialled Black Bay chronographs. Tudor was originally created to provide more affordable timepieces that leveraged Rolex designs and fabrication with mass-produced movements. The brand now stands on its own two feet, still within the Wilsdorf group but producing their novelties independent of the crown and with their own manufacture calibers. Tudor, however, has just entered uncharted territory for the brand – introducing a solid gold Tudor Black Bay 58 18K with a green bezel and dial. It was a huge surprise upon its presentation, with many celebrating a new opportunity to acquire a hulkish Wilsdorf design. In the wake of the big news we have found the watch community simultaneously appreciating its design, but also wondering how Tudor will fare with this new metal and higher price point for the brand. A quick rundown of the new Tudor Black Bay 58 18K ref. 79018V The new Tudor Black Bay 58 18K was a very unexpected entry into their Black Bay catalogue. The case is made from… Read More

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