The relationship between Tudor and Australia stretches back to the 1940s – there’s a good chance your father or even grandfather has a watch bearing the distinctive rose or shield logo. But as the brand commences an exciting renaissance, it’s time for the second chapter in the Australian Tudor story. Time+Tide are honoured to partner with Tudor as they win over a new generation of watch lovers.

Two-tone watch anxiety? Here's your solution

two-tone watch

Editor's note: The two-tone watch seems to be having a resurgence of late, especially in the design studio of Tudor. While we first saw this in a subdued black dial Tudor S&G, the following year they gave us a champagne dial, and this year a two-tone chronograph on a bund strap no less. But two-tone watches aren't always easy to pull off, with the spectre of the '80s looming large in the peripheries of people's minds. To help you reconcile your desire to buy a two-tone watch, and your discomfort with Wall Street stereotypes, we have created a handy guide for you on how you can approach this bi-colour problem.  Now, if you've watched my review of the Tudor S&G you'll know that I'm #team2tone all the way, but the thing is, I don't *really* know how to wear it. I mean, I think I'd be OK in more formal settings — just pair it with a suit and away you go, but in every other part of my life — not so sure. I've got two-tone anxiety, and I'm sure I'm not the only one. Because, much as we're all aware that the mix of precious and plain metals… Read More

Read More No Comments

Tudor in Australia for almost 100 years? Here's why

Tudor in Australia

Editor's note: Not many know it, but Australia was one of the most important markets for Hans Wilsdorf as he built the businesses of Rolex and Tudor in the early part of the 20th century. Tudor watches have been in Australia for the best part of 100 years, proving that Australians know great value when they see it — value the brand continues to offer today. While our American and English cousins have only recently rediscovered the joys of Tudor watches (relaunching in the American market in 2013 and the UK in 2014), Australia can stand proud in the knowledge that we've been wearing watches emblazoned with the Tudor shield and Tudor rose for the last 83 years. Tudor first came to Australia in 1932. History shows that it was merely eight years after Hans Wilsdorf registered the trademark "The Tudor" in 1926. The Australian distributor was the jewellery firm Willis & Sons – who had been importing, wholesaling and manufacturing jewellery since 1858. While Australia in the '30s wasn't the centre of the watchmaking world, we did have a pretty significant expertise and background in jewellery, thanks to the gold rush – so it's not entirely surprising that we would… Read More

Read More No Comments

Half a decade with the Tudor Black Bay Blue

Tudor Black Bay Blue

Editor's note: We remember back when times were simpler. Back before there were half-decade waitlists, before secondhand watches were doubling retail prices, and before everything Tudor made was in-house. It was back in 2014 when Tudor first showed us the versatility of the Black Bay range, and the brand deeply impressed the watch community when they released the Black Bay Blue. This was also the year when Time+Tide started, and Felix's review of this new Black Bay Blue was one of the most popular stories on the site for a long time. So we thought we'd look back at this simple sports watch to see how it's aged over the last half-decade, and reflect on just how much the industry has changed in that time.  Introducing the Tudor Black Bay Blue As a brand, Tudor is a lot like Rocky, in that Rolex's little brother is a plucky fighter come good again. UNLIKE Rocky, Tudor's releases just get better and better with each passing year. Baselworld 2014 sees two big crowd-pleasing releases from Tudor, and a new range that is understated in the extreme, though still enticing. We'll talk more about the Ranger and the Style later, but for now let's focus… Read More

Read More No Comments

Two-tone watch anxiety? Here's your solution

two-tone watch

Editor's note: The two-tone watch seems to be having a resurgence of late, especially in the design studio of Tudor. While we first saw this in a subdued black dial Tudor S&G, the following year they gave us a champagne dial, and this year a two-tone chronograph on a bund strap no less. But two-tone watches aren't always easy to pull off, with the spectre of the '80s looming large in the peripheries of people's minds. To help you reconcile your desire to buy a two-tone watch, and your discomfort with Wall Street stereotypes, we have created a handy guide for you on how you can approach this bi-colour problem.  Now, if you've watched my review of the Tudor S&G you'll know that I'm #team2tone all the way, but the thing is, I don't *really* know how to wear it. I mean, I think I'd be OK in more formal settings — just pair it with a suit and away you go, but in every other part of my life — not so sure. I've got two-tone anxiety, and I'm sure I'm not the only one. Because, much as we're all aware that the mix of precious and plain metals… Read More

Read More No Comments

Doubling down on two-tone – the Tudor Black Bay Chrono S&G

Two years can be a long time in the life of a product – long enough for it to go from controversial to comfortably accepted, or even loved, as its challenging elements become softened by familiarity. That's certainly true for two of the watches introduced by Tudor in 2017, which attracted attention and controversy in equal measure. For the Black Bay Heritage S&G, it was a matter of aesthetics: the (then) courageous reintroduction of two-tone – a stylistic blast from the past that was either cool or cringe-making, depending on where you were during its previous heyday, the 1980s. The other was more than skin-deep: the Black Bay Chronograph [read Felix's review here] is a mash-up of diver's watch and chronograph – and purists don't like hybrids (remember the howling that greeted the Porsche Cayenne when it made its debut in 2002?). The rotating bezel of the dive watch became a fixed bezel with a tachymeter scale and the square tip of the snowflake hour hand – so great for underwater visibility – conceals part of the chronograph minutes register between 2 and 4 o'clock (shock!). Skip ahead to 2019 (a world where genre-fluid watches have become almost as familiar… Read More

Read More No Comments

People are clearly still polarised by the Tudor Black Bay P01 – which team are you in?

Chatter about controversial watches happens everywhere from the halls of Baselworld to the comments section of Instagram, but the fury is often short-lived. A couple of notable exceptions released in 2019 included the 11.59 Collection by Audemars Piguet, and for different reasons – the Tudor P01. When we posted a pic of it on Instagram this morning, we were sharply reminded that this model is not done polarising people. While it seemed that the delivery of  a more steady stream of Black Bay Fifty-Eights (as well as a recent flourish of Black Bay S&G Chronographs) to retailers' cabinets had taken the spotlight off this less everyday addition to the family, this morning it was suddenly front, centre and in the firing line. Both of loving and loathsome comments. Before we get to them, let's review the story so far. The Tudor P01 Recap: Tudor shocked the watch-loving community at Baselworld 2019 with the release of the P01, a reissue of a prototype watch designed for the US Navy in the 1960s. The brand published teasers through social media before Baselworld that sent enthusiasts into a frenzy, with predictions that a reissue of their iconic Submariner dive watch was about to hit… Read More

Read More No Comments

Everybody wants a Tudor Black Bay. But what about the chrono? Anyone?

Editor's note: The Tudor Black Bay had an extraordinary beginning when it was released in 2012, with the Black Bay red finally giving the brand its flagship model. I remember seeing it in the window of the booth and basically attaching myself to the glass like an abalone. A distressed leather strap with boss-looking deployant. A rich burgundy / red bezel. Gilt touches on indices. A perfect colour dial. Details for days. Shut up and take my money. I had one on my wrist just a few months later. And the Black Bay had a stupendous 2018, when the Black Bay '58 which many are now hailing the 'perfect watch' for the money, fronted up shoulder to shoulder with the Black Bay Pepsi GMT, a watch I mistakenly included in my Top 10. And then retracted, so strongly did I feel I got it wrong. The success of Tudor's 2018 campaign is still felt by those waiting patiently on wait lists for both models. A wait list for a Tudor. Like I said, stupendous. But what about the middle years? And in particular, the chrono? A steel & gold version was released this year, with a dramatic colourway and a cool strap. Let's take a… Read More

Read More No Comments

Products Filter

Product Lug Size

Product Size