Rado's story is fused with nearly three decades of innovation in high-tech ceramic. This challenging and rewarding material has been central to the brand's approach to watchmaking, with its smooth stylish surfaces that can be metallic or matt and crafted in an ever-expanding array of colours. Rado's watches are as much objects of art, glamour and craftsmanship as they are tellers of time.

VIDEO: The Rado Captain Cook comes correct

captain cook

First released in 1962, the Rado Captain Cook offers firepower on the wrist, as well as more than half a century of rich history. The initial production numbers may have been small during the swinging '60s, but the Captain Cook left its mark on dive watch enthusiasts around the world, and in 2017 Rado treated its fans with a re-release of the famous watch. In this example with a black dial, we are offered a 42mm steel case with a glossy black bezel that frames the dial nicely. The blend of brushed and polished surfaces on the case add contrast, and sharpen the lines of the case as they taper into the faceted lugs. Arriving on a beads of rice bracelet is the perfect companion to the Captain Cook, giving a taste of the pioneering dive watch days with this style of bracelet was enormously popular, as well as the functional aspect of supreme comfort that it offers. While the market for Swiss-made dive watches is a crowded one, the Rado Captain Cook Automatic can proudly stand on its own two feet, with a strength of design that has carried it over five decades, and is both accessibly sized and… Read More

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Tracing the journey of Rado's Captain Cook

Up until a few years ago, Rado's Captain Cook was a rather obscure watch. A stylish skin diver from the middle of last century, a time when many brands (many of whom aren't around these days) tried their hands at the genre. Rado made Captain Cook watches from 1962 to 1972. After then, the brand shifted its focus to other areas, like absolutely crushing it in the world of high-tech ceramics. But, driven by the powerful winds of the heritage-style revival, the Captain Cook surfaced again, at Baselworld 2017, and over the last few years has become well-regarded by critics and watch lovers alike. We're going to have a look at seven key models in the modern Captain Cook line-up.  Rado Captain Cook Automatic limited edition  This little 37mm looker started it all. A limited edition of 1962 pieces, it was a surprise hit of Basel 2017 because it was such a faithful take on the 1962 original.  Rado Captain Cook Automatic  In addition to the LE, Rado also released a regular production version of the Captain Cook, which was practically identical. The only major differences were a simpler black dial, and a three-link steel bracelet.  Rado HyperChrome Captain Cook … Read More

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Looking back to the future with Rado's Captain Cook Mark III

Editor's note: You don't need to be a naval captain (or even a cook) to appreciate the lovely case shape and bold details of the Rado Captain Cook Mk III. So funky, so so smooth. The other day we showed you the very heritage-inspired Captain Cook Mark II from Rado. Well, now it's time for the other side of the coin, the modern take on an old classic. Meet the Rado Tradition Captain Cook Mark III. On paper, it's a titanium-cased diver with an internal bezel. On the wrist, it's so much more. The titanium case is large (46mm large), but not overwhelmingly so, thanks to a curvy, lugless case design. And while the Mark II is reflection city, this guy sucks up the light like nobody's business, thanks to the super-hard matt finish. The domed sapphire crystal is something else, showing every tiny popping yellow detail on the dial below. And while all the individual elements are pretty good, what I appreciate the most about this watch is the whole picture — it's a modern dive watch that's fit for purpose, and one that manages to be its own creation rather than an homage (knowing or otherwise) to other… Read More

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VIDEO: The Rado Captain Cook comes correct

captain cook

First released in 1962, the Rado Captain Cook offers firepower on the wrist, as well as more than half a century of rich history. The initial production numbers may have been small during the swinging '60s, but the Captain Cook left its mark on dive watch enthusiasts around the world, and in 2017 Rado treated its fans with a re-release of the famous watch. In this example with a black dial, we are offered a 42mm steel case with a glossy black bezel that frames the dial nicely. The blend of brushed and polished surfaces on the case add contrast, and sharpen the lines of the case as they taper into the faceted lugs. Arriving on a beads of rice bracelet is the perfect companion to the Captain Cook, giving a taste of the pioneering dive watch days with this style of bracelet was enormously popular, as well as the functional aspect of supreme comfort that it offers. While the market for Swiss-made dive watches is a crowded one, the Rado Captain Cook Automatic can proudly stand on its own two feet, with a strength of design that has carried it over five decades, and is both accessibly sized and… Read More

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Vintage inspiration in a modern package – the Rado Captain Cook 45mm

Editor's note: Rado's star is firmly in ascendance these days, and that's thanks to watches like their popular Captain Cook Reissue. And while we've got a whole lot of love for the smaller versions, sometimes — no matter what people say — size does matter. So, how about 45mm of Rado Captain Cook goodness?  Rado's HyperChrome Captain Cook has made waves this year, mostly due to the nearly pitch-perfect 37mm reissue. And while there's a lot to like about that watch, I suspect that the comparatively petite case size will be a deal-breaker for some people. But that's OK because Rado has covered their bases by releasing a contemporarily sized 45mm version. It's not just the case size that's impressive, but also the construction – with ceramic bezel, hardened titanium case construction and a solid 80 hours of power reserve. Rado HyperChrome Captain Cook 45mm Australian pricing Rado HyperChrome Captain Cook 45mm, $3175  

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Looking back at Rado's best heritage watches

Editor's note: Over the last few years, Rado — traditionally the masters of design-y ceramic timepieces — have stepped their heritage game WAY up. Their Captain Cook line, in particular, is a real gem, and a solid value prop. Here's our take on Rado's best heritage watches.  Rado isn't a brand that you typically think of when you think about 'heritage'. On the one hand this makes perfect sense, as the brand is best known for their decidedly modern materials and avant-garde designs. But on the other, Rado has been around for a while (since 1917), and has a host of great old styles to draw on. And, in recent years, Rado has been more active in doing just that, and we've picked our favourites. Naturally, the Captain Cook looms large, in both its faithful — near facsimile grade — models, as well as the larger, more modern interpretations. And then there's the super chunky, super funky HyperChrome 1616, a really cool take on a cushion case. If these watches prove anything it's that Rado has what it takes to make a heritage release that holds up with the best of them, and we can't wait to see what 2019… Read More

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4 bronze watches you may have missed from $700 to $7000, including Zelos, Bell & Ross and Montblanc

The use of bronze as a case material in watchmaking has surpassed trend to establish itself as a mainstay. Certain bronzed, beautiful models have achieved legend status, such as the Panerai Bronzo, the OG of modern bronze watches, but just as many go undiscovered and unheralded – we compiled a quartet of very different offerings, from big and square, to a very cool indie execution from an Asian-based brand, to the extremely odd pairing of bronze with ceramic. All watches are taken from our recent Buying Guide, which you can access free, and in full, here. Zelos Mako 500 Singapore-based Zelos Watches are a prime example of why microbrands matter, by using unusual materials like carbon fibre, meteorite and, in this case, bronze. The brand offers great quality at a more than reasonable price. That's evident here, with a wavy radial patterned dial that adds visual depth and reminds you that this diver is good for 500 metres. Case size 40mm Case material CuSn8 Bronze Movement SW200 Price $799 USD Bell & Ross BR 03-92 Diver Bronze In 2017, Bell & Ross caused a splash and introduced their first ever square cased dive watch. This year they've done it again,… Read More

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