Rado's story is fused with nearly three decades of innovation in high-tech ceramic. This challenging and rewarding material has been central to the brand's approach to watchmaking, with its smooth stylish surfaces that can be metallic or matt and crafted in an ever-expanding array of colours. Rado's watches are as much objects of art, glamour and craftsmanship as they are tellers of time.

VIDEO: Bare bones — the Rado HyperChrome Skeleton Automatic Chronograph

For all that skeletonised watches are meant to be about reducing mass, the Rado HyperChrome Skeleton Automatic Chronograph is a watch with a lot of substance, and much of it ceramic. The case, middle, bezel and bracelet are all made from Rado’s signature material, and have been treated with a range of processes — keeping it interesting on the wrist. Though having said that, the dial also does a fine job in the ‘interesting’ department. Sure, you get a peep into the inner workings of the automatic chronograph movement, along with a quite legible handset, but what I really like is the under-the-dial printing, which is delicate and very much in keeping with Rado’s designer aesthetic. All this, combined with the 45mm case size, adds up to an unmissable watch. The Rado HyperChrome Skeleton Automatic Chronograph Limited Edition Australian pricing The Rado HyperChrome Skeleton Automatic Chronograph Limited Edition, limited to 600 pieces, $9475

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VIDEO: Looking back to the future with Rado’s Tradition Captain Cook Mark III

The other day we showed you the very heritage-inspired Captain Cook Mark II from Rado. Well, now it’s time for the other side of the coin, the modern take on an old classic. Meet the Rado Tradition Captain Cook Mark III. On paper, it’s a titanium-cased diver with an internal bezel. On the wrist, it’s so much more. The titanium case is large (46mm large), but not overwhelmingly so, thanks to a curvy, lugless case design. And while the Mark II is reflection city, this guy sucks up the light like nobody’s business, thanks to the super-hard matt finish. The domed sapphire crystal is something else, showing every tiny popping yellow detail on the dial below. And while all the individual elements are pretty good, what I appreciate the most about this watch is the whole picture — it’s a modern dive watch that’s fit for purpose, and one that manages to be its own creation rather than an homage (knowing or otherwise) to other designs. Bravo Rado! Rado Tradition Captain Cook Mark III Australian pricing and availability Rado Tradition Captain Cook Mark III, $3450

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VIDEO: The Rado Heritage Captain Cook Tradition Mark II – when 37mm packs a big punch

Last year, Rado had a breakthrough, heritage-inspired hit with their Captain Cook, a slightly quirky 37mm diver. This year they’ve doubled down on the Captain, with the Mark II, a curvy, funky ’60s-inspired diver. The heritage look is really strong, from the super-polished cushion case, through to the super high crystal and the era-appropriate dial details, like the broad hour markers and internal bezel. Though I think what I like most about this Rado is, funnily enough, the bracelet. So often the bracelet is an afterthought, tacked on at the end. But Rado have clearly thought this one through. It’s a solid-feeling ‘beads-of-rice’ style bracelet, on a single fold clasp with a lovely vintage look. It looks the part and wears well on the wrist. The other major surprise about this watch was just how well it wore for a 37mm piece. I’ve got a fairly large wrist and 37mm is a size I typically wouldn’t go for, but in this case it works. So I’d say, if you like the look but aren’t sure about the case width, I’d strongly suggest trying it on for size. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised. Rado Heritage Captain Cook Tradition Mark II… Read More

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VIDEO: Bare bones — the Rado HyperChrome Skeleton Automatic Chronograph

For all that skeletonised watches are meant to be about reducing mass, the Rado HyperChrome Skeleton Automatic Chronograph is a watch with a lot of substance, and much of it ceramic. The case, middle, bezel and bracelet are all made from Rado’s signature material, and have been treated with a range of processes — keeping it interesting on the wrist. Though having said that, the dial also does a fine job in the ‘interesting’ department. Sure, you get a peep into the inner workings of the automatic chronograph movement, along with a quite legible handset, but what I really like is the under-the-dial printing, which is delicate and very much in keeping with Rado’s designer aesthetic. All this, combined with the 45mm case size, adds up to an unmissable watch. The Rado HyperChrome Skeleton Automatic Chronograph Limited Edition Australian pricing The Rado HyperChrome Skeleton Automatic Chronograph Limited Edition, limited to 600 pieces, $9475

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VIDEO: Rado’s HyperChrome Ultra Light lives up to the name

For me, the HyperChrome Ultra Light is one of the coolest, cleanest watches in Rado’s collection. Yes, Rado’s heritage collection is earning some serious cred, and their design-y limited editions really showcase their high-tech capabilities. But for me it’s all about the HyperChrome Ultra Light. It’s a regular, round, daily wear watch (and a well-sized one at 43mm) — but with a twist. The watch weighs hardly anything — 56 grams — thanks to the high-tech ceramic and titanium case construction. It also looks good, with a clean, sunburst dial in a chameleonic black-brown colour, and minimal printed details. The gold-tone case sides add a subtle touch of bling, which keeps it from being overly or aggressively minimal. So, high-tech construction and timeless style with a twist — classic Rado. Rado HyperChrome Ultra Light Rado’s HyperChrome Ultra Light, $4125

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VIDEO: Old meets new in the Rado HyperChrome Bronze

A few years ago we were prepared to write off the use of bronze in watchmaking as something of a fad, limited to a few cult models. Well. We were wrong. The ancient alloy has boomed in popularity, thanks to its warm tones and, more importantly, the fact that it develops a unique patina over time. And while bronze cases look set to stick around, so far it’s a case material that’s found overwhelmingly in the heritage reissue aisle of the watch supermarket — which makes sense as it’s all about the old world charm. But, really, I think that’s a bit of a short-sighted choice. And it looks like someone at Rado agrees, as the HyperChrome Bronze offers a new path forward for the metal. It’s been selectively integrated into the sides of the case, while the bulk of the watch remains touch, and distinctly non-patina prone ceramic. It might be a meeting of new and old materials, but the thinking behind it is decidedly now.

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HANDS-ON: The Rado HyperChrome Skeleton Automatic Chronograph

At Baselworld this year we saw Rado doubling down with two new limited-edition versions of their everyday and sporty HyperChrome chronograph. The first version, the HyperChrome Bronze, takes its form inside a case crafted from a combination of high-tech ceramic and bronze. While the second opens up its ceramic case, foregoing a traditional dial and skeletonizing the movement. Earlier this week I went hands-on with the patina-friendly bronze version, and today it’s time to take a peek at (and through) the stripped back dial of the aptly named HyperChrome Skeleton. Vital statistics Consisting of an inner monobloc ceramic case with stainless-steel side inserts, and chronograph pushers and crown, the 45mm case is water resistant to 100 metres. Steel sides are polished, while the ceramic components are fired with a black pigment inside a high-tech oven at 1450°C, creating the super hard and lightweight case that is then extensively sandblasted to a matt finish – except for the ceramic bezel, which is polished and engraved with a tachymeter scale. Sapphire crystal on the front and back gives a view through to the openworked ETA 2894-2 chronograph movement inside. With its plate and bridges cut away into a latticework, and exposing its… Read More

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