Founded in 1881, Seiko is Japan’s leading watch company and one of the world’s largest in-house watch manufactures. In addition to Seiko branded watches, they also produce high-end timepieces under the Grand Seiko and Credor labels.

Seiko vs. Garmin – who will survive an ultramarathon?

One of the most beautiful elements of the mechanical watch is it doesn't rely on disposable units of lithium to function. If you keep moving, your watch will too. This forms a dependent partnership that for many collectors is a huge emotional attraction to the mechanical watch. The energy from your fingertips directly transfers power into the micro-mechanical marvel that keeps you on time. This was the reason I wanted to wear a mechanical watch on my first attempt at an ultramarathon. My brother had convinced me to run 100km along the stunning coastline between Apollo Bay and the Twelve Apostles, and while I was definitely taking my (ancient) Garmin Forerunner 910XT, I was also very tempted to wear my Seiko SRP777. This dive watch has been reliable on a few adventures (significantly further above sea level than below), and I while it did mysteriously stop ticking on a Mongolian mountain range once, it is still the watch I trust the most. On the morning of the run we rose at 3am to get on the trail by 4am. With only around 10 hours of daylight and our prediction of at least 15 hours to complete the distance, we started… Read More

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HANDS-ON: The Seiko Prospex 'Street Series' Solar Diver SNE533P

Seiko's distinctive shrouded diver (commonly called the 'Tuna Can') is a real cult model, due in equal parts to its indestructibility and its distinctive design. It's a watch that stands out from across the street, or in five metres of murky water — depending on how you like to use your dive watches.  Having said that, this solar-powered iteration — one part of a trio — is aimed more at a topside clientele, as the 'Street Series' sobriquet suggests. The series is offered in three colours — navy blue (which we've got here), an olive-y green and grey. The colour is due to the silicon strap, the shroud, the bezel and the dial. And for all that this is a lot of colour, the lack of contrast or superlative (dare I say flashy) design elements give the Street Series watches a serious, purposeful sensibility. They will also go quite well with a variety of outfits, which is a boon.  But don't be mistaken for thinking that these watches are style over substance. They're still every millimetre the legendary Seiko diver — all 47 of them. They're rated to 200 metres, and generally considered to be bombproof (don't test the theory). Adding… Read More

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HANDS-ON: Swimming with sharks – the Seiko Prospex SRPD21K Save the Ocean 

Last year, Seiko announced their Save the Ocean initiative – a partnership between famed underwater explorer and conservationist Fabien Cousteau and Seiko Prospex. This program is aimed at raising awareness (and funds) for marine conservation. It was also a partnership that saw some very cool 'Save the Ocean' editions of classic Seiko divers.  Well, it's 2019 now, and time for another edition of this feel-good diver. And while the blue colour theme is the same, the details are a little different. Meet the Save the Ocean Great White Shark edition 'turtle' diver, AKA the Seiko SRPD21K. Fundamentally, this is the same Seiko diver we all know and love: 45mm case, Hardlex crystal, more than enough lume to shake the room (tick, tick, tick, boom), a crown at four allowing you to change the time, day and date on the 4R36 movement, a diver's bezel with a blue and black aluminium insert, and a solid steel bracelet.  What's new though is, of course, the dial. It's a metallic, shimmering oceanic blue, with a pressed pattern on it evoking, if not quite Hokusai's Great Wave then certainly some pretty choppy seas. The link between the watch and saving the ocean could not be… Read More

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Seiko vs. Garmin – who will survive an ultramarathon?

One of the most beautiful elements of the mechanical watch is it doesn't rely on disposable units of lithium to function. If you keep moving, your watch will too. This forms a dependent partnership that for many collectors is a huge emotional attraction to the mechanical watch. The energy from your fingertips directly transfers power into the micro-mechanical marvel that keeps you on time. This was the reason I wanted to wear a mechanical watch on my first attempt at an ultramarathon. My brother had convinced me to run 100km along the stunning coastline between Apollo Bay and the Twelve Apostles, and while I was definitely taking my (ancient) Garmin Forerunner 910XT, I was also very tempted to wear my Seiko SRP777. This dive watch has been reliable on a few adventures (significantly further above sea level than below), and I while it did mysteriously stop ticking on a Mongolian mountain range once, it is still the watch I trust the most. On the morning of the run we rose at 3am to get on the trail by 4am. With only around 10 hours of daylight and our prediction of at least 15 hours to complete the distance, we started… Read More

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Is this the best blacked-out Seiko dive watch of recent times for under a grand?

Editor's note: The competition is mounting and mounting fast, but when the SRPC49K – or 'Darth Turtle', as it was coined by followers in a Time+Tide poll – was first released it was at the front of what would prove to be a vanguard of dark Seiko divers at still reasonable price points. The advent of the Seiko Prospex LX SNR029J at Baselworld 2019 has introduced even more contenders, but again at a much higher price. Which leaves this model as perhaps the ultimate blacked-out Seiko diver prospect for the money. Fair warning that the model is long sold out, but still can be found without too much digging.  Seiko dive watches are a perennial favourite. They're tough-as, look the business, and have a history as long and proud as any. Whether it's the coveted SLA017, or the classic Turtle, they've got a strong rep, and cult following. The Seiko faithful are going to be very happy with this latest limited edition – the SRPC49K, which we've taken the liberty of nicknaming 'the night diver' (I'm really hoping this catches on). We're going to let these stunning pictures do most of the talking, but here are the details we have so far: The SRPC49K is a blacked-out variant of the… Read More

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HANDS-ON: The Golden Turtle – Seiko's Prospex SRPC44

Seiko's core Prospex diver, known as the 'Turtle', is a rock-solid watch that's a well-deserved fan favourite. And it's easy to see why. It's a compelling mix of classic, conservative dive watch style and idiosyncratic design that's downright charming.  It's also quite a versatile platform, as numerous colour combinations, and dials demonstrate. If the blacked-out Ninja Turtle and blue-textured dials of the Save the Ocean editions weren't enough to convince you, I present the Seiko Prospex SRPC44, colloquially known as the Golden Turtle.  Before we get to what it's like to wear this (very) gold watch on the wrist, let's cover off a few of the core specifications of the Turtle. It clocks in at a very solid 45mm across (according to Seiko's website), and 13.4mm tall. The crystal is Hardlex, Seiko's proprietary tough mineral crystal. The band is an accordion-style diver in silicon, with gold-tone buckle and a metal keeper. The movement is the 4R36, which has hacking, hand-winding a date and a day. All good stuff. The case is rated to 200 metres and the relevant sections of the dial and hands are coated with enough Lumibrite to keep you up at night.  So that's the nuts and… Read More

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LIST: 3 things you need to know about the Seiko Prospex LX collection, according to the man who designed them

Seiko's Baselworld press conference is one of my few must-not-miss appointments, if only for a much-needed dose of humour. But for me, the real star of this year's affair was Ken Okuyama. Mr Okuyama is an industrial designer with an eponymous studio, who made his name in the world of prestige cars, with a folio including such epic vehicles as the original Honda NSX, the Enzo Ferrari and the Ferrari California. And while much of his career has been spent with some of the great European marques, he's recently turned his eyes homeward, working on raising the profile and prestige of Japanese and Asian brands. Which is why he's the creative mind behind the brand new Prospex LX collection. Here are three things that stood out to me about how Mr Okuyama intends to make these watches stand out. "When left alone, heritage becomes antique" Evolution is required to make a modern value for a brand's heritage. Mr Okuyama reiterated that for luxury brands, design continuity is critical. For all that a Porsche 911 from the '60s looks the same as one from 2019, they're completely different objects. The same is true for Seiko's professional series watches. "Simple, robust and… Read More

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