Founded in 1881, Seiko is Japan’s leading watch company and one of the world’s largest in-house watch manufactures. In addition to Seiko branded watches, they also produce high-end timepieces under the Grand Seiko and Credor labels.

VIDEO: This Seiko Turtle is set to Save The Ocean – the SRPC91K

For Seiko, the turtle power is real. Their recent reinterpretation of the classic dive watch has earned near-universal acclaim, thanks to the triple threat of strong design, stronger build quality and a value offering that’s hard to beat. And while the core collection is outstanding, Seiko like to drop something a little bit extra special every so often. And that’s exactly what this watch is: a special edition with a very special gradient blue dial that works towards supporting an even more special cause. I don’t know about you, but I’d find it impossible not to smile while checking the time on this diver — mostly because of how awesomely vivid the blue is (seriously, just look at that dial), but also because it helped, in its own tiny way, to improve our precious marine environment. Seiko Prospex SRPC91K ‘Save The Ocean’ Turtle Australian pricing Seiko Prospex SRPC91K ‘Save The Ocean’, $725

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HANDS-ON: Sun and sea combined – the Seiko Prospex ‘Save The Ocean’ SSC675P

What do whales, chronographs and solar charging have in common? And no, I’m not talking about a hypothetical scheme involving Elon Musk, and the launching of an around the world race, with solar-powered propellers attached to specially trained whales. Cool as that may be – although probably not humane – all three things become one in the Seiko Prospex ‘Save The Ocean’ SSC675P. If you’re not already familiar with this year’s ‘Save The Ocean’ series by Seiko, a portion of all sales from each of the series’ three models goes towards saving the ocean. With Seiko working in conjunction with noted marine conservationist Fabien Cousteau. Each special edition watch in the series features a wave-like dial resembling the skin of the mighty blue whale. However, while the other two watches in the series are strictly automatic three-handed affairs, and their dials graduate from an iridescent blue at the top to an almost black at the bottom, the dial of this version differs ever so slightly and maintains its own intense shade of blue throughout – although in certain light, you’d be forgiven for seeing purple. And contrast is introduced by the equally as blue bi-coloured bezel and the radiant outer ring… Read More

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IN-DEPTH: The Seiko Samurai ‘Save The Ocean’ SRPC93K

The story in a second: Same great watch, brand new dial. The centrepiece of Seiko’s 2018 Prospex collection is, without doubt, the brand new and very blue ‘Save The Ocean’ series, offered in Turtle, Samurai and solar variants. It follows on from the recent Black Series and Blue Lagoon. But while last year’s limited edition was purely a cosmetic update, the Save The Ocean release has an element of social responsibility. Seiko has teamed up with Fabien Cousteau (grandson of Jacques-Yves Cousteau), who is himself a marine conservationist, to raise funds and awareness for Cousteau’s Ocean Learning Centre. Part of this awareness-raising involves prominent displays of what healthy and not-so-healthy marine environments look like in several Australian cities. So, not only do these watches look the part, they also do their part. The case First up, aside from the dial and bezel, this watch is pretty much identical to its regular release brethren. So, you’re getting the same angular, slightly blocky steel case, with solid proportions of 43.8mm across and 12.82mm tall — with a neatly knurled crown at three and fairly pointy guards. One point of difference between this and the regular Samurai models is that the grippy bezel… Read More

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VIDEO: This Seiko Turtle is set to Save The Ocean – the SRPC91K

For Seiko, the turtle power is real. Their recent reinterpretation of the classic dive watch has earned near-universal acclaim, thanks to the triple threat of strong design, stronger build quality and a value offering that’s hard to beat. And while the core collection is outstanding, Seiko like to drop something a little bit extra special every so often. And that’s exactly what this watch is: a special edition with a very special gradient blue dial that works towards supporting an even more special cause. I don’t know about you, but I’d find it impossible not to smile while checking the time on this diver — mostly because of how awesomely vivid the blue is (seriously, just look at that dial), but also because it helped, in its own tiny way, to improve our precious marine environment. Seiko Prospex SRPC91K ‘Save The Ocean’ Turtle Australian pricing Seiko Prospex SRPC91K ‘Save The Ocean’, $725

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HANDS-ON: Three hands and a whole lot of dial – the Seiko Presage Shippo Enamel Limited Edition SPB075

For me, the appeal of a watch’s dial is perhaps its biggest selling point. Too bland and I’m not interested, too busy and it’s not for me. There’s a fine line between pleasure and pain. Luckily for me, though, it’s always a pleasure when I get a chance to spend some time with the Seiko Presage collection, which combines the Japanese brand’s love of traditional craftsmanship and their mechanical know-how with an affordable price tag. Once available only in Japan, the collection was finally made available to the rest of the world in 2016. And let me tell you, this year’s addition had me at its dial. Crafted using Shippo enamel – a method developed in 17th century Japan – each engraved dial measures no more than 1mm thick and is made by craftsmen at the Japanese specialist manufacturer Ando Cloisonné, which was founded in the 19th century. First hand-painted with a lead-free glaze, and then fired at 800 degrees Celsius. The entire process must be repeated several times to ensure an evenness of the enamel, before finally being polished to reveal the delicate radiating pattern below. The finished product is a sight to behold, and one that, frankly, shows… Read More

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VIDEO: The detail in the deep blue dial – Seiko’s Shippo Enamel SPB073

Often the best watches are those that come with a story attached. Sometimes that story can be attached to momentous events or achievements the watch is associated with, or the accomplishments of those who wore it. It can also be a story of how it’s made and who it’s made by. Such is the case with Seiko’s latest additions to their Presage collection — the limited edition Shippo Enamel watches. The form of these watches will be familiar to those who have come across the Presage line before, with its elongated Roman numerals and classical hands. This version, the SPB073, also sports a power reserve and date subdial to keep things interesting but, honestly, the texture of the dial itself is so good, it doesn’t need anything superfluous. As the name suggests, the dial is made using Shippo enamel, a technique that dates back to 17th century Japan, and involves several layers of blue enamel being applied and fired, to build a rich, deep colour over the guilloché base — which really shines after a final polish. The dials are all hand done by a craftsman named Wataru Totani. The results are deeply beautiful. But more than that, they make… Read More

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LIST: Why these 3 Seiko Cocktail Times are perfect for a woman’s wrist – and what to wear them with

It’s little wonder that when Seiko released its Presage Cocktail Time watch to the international market last year (until then it was available only to the Japanese domestic market) it was an immediate hit. The gorgeous, sunray-patterned dial, the chic colours, the tremendous value for money … Although pitched as a men’s watch, it gained legions of female fans – although for many it provoked a severe case of FOMO or, more accurately, KIMO (know I’m missing out). That’s because although the watch is perfectly proportioned, its 40.5mm diameter is just too big for women with tiny wrists. Seiko must have been listening because – hurrah! – we have a new collection, identical to the original Cocktail Time except for its 33.8mm diameter. Now, I’m no fan of the “shrink it for the ladies” school of watch design (or, rather, failure-to-design), but here’s a notable exception: It Totally Works. There’s no compromise on the details, no gratuitous adding of diamonds (“Because that’s what the ladies like”, supposedly); the movement is the same super-reliable and robust self-winding calibre 4R35 as the men’s; and the scaled-down proportions are spot-on. The size hits that Goldilocks spot for a modern woman’s watch — not too… Read More

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