Founded in 1881, Seiko is Japan’s leading watch company and one of the world’s largest in-house watch manufactures. In addition to Seiko branded watches, they also produce high-end timepieces under the Grand Seiko and Credor labels.

ANNOUNCING: Seiko release stunning blue enamel dial Seiko Presage SPB069 ‘Moonlit Night’

The name of this watch gives much away about its romantic, dare we even say, poetic roots. Seiko do not usually name their watches. This makes them very difficult to tell your friends about. Unless, of course, you have a beautiful mind, and can rattle off Seiko references. Which describes no one in the Time+Tide team. So, long before we saw any images, when we heard the ‘SPB069’ was going to be named the ‘Moonlit Night’ our interest was piqued. It is inspired, the press release says, by the night sky and “Japan’s fascination with the moon”. It combines “mechanical watchmaking and Japanese craftsmanship in the form of enamel, expressed for the first time in a rich blue dial”. The blue enamel dial is the work of enamel craftsman Mitsuru Yokozawa and his team, who made the white enamel dials that caused us — in colloquial Australian slang — to go completely off ours when we discovered them on other Presage models. Enamel is an exacting art, and blue enamel is particularly difficult as the viscosity is much higher. The skill required to achieve evenness is even more demanding than usual. And due to the small surface area of a watch dial, and… Read More

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HANDS-ON: Seiko show their dark side with the Prospex SSC673P and SNE493P

Seiko has just released three limited edition black divers, and they couldn’t be hotter. We’ve already shown you the automatic SRPC49K, but there are two solar options on the table as well. The SSC673P is a stealthy version of the SSC618P we looked at a little while ago. It’s worth noting that in these images the 15-minute demarcation period on the bezel is quite pale. We shot a pre-production model, and I’m not sure if the colour will be the same on the final model. It measures 43.5mm across and is powered by the cal. V175. Seiko Prospex SSC673P Moving onto the SNE493P. With the now familiar black and orange colour scheme, this solar diver has a raised chapter ring that adds a nice amount of texture to the dial. The case is 43.5mm across, with crown (and guards) at three. It comes on a silicone dive strap. Seiko Prospex SNE493P Seiko Prospex SSC673P and SNE493P Australian availability and pricing Seiko Prospex SSC673P, $650; and SNE493P, $625, both limited and available in early 2018. Images by Jason Reekie. 

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VIDEO: Blacked-out beauty – the Seiko Prospex SRPC49K

Seiko dive watches are a perennial favourite. They’re tough-as, look the business, and have a history as long and proud as any. Whether it’s the coveted SLA017, or the classic Turtle, they’ve got a strong rep, and cult following. The Seiko faithful are going to be very happy with this latest limited edition – the SRPC49K, which we’ve taken the liberty of nicknaming ‘the night diver’ (I’m really hoping this catches on). We’re going to let these stunning pictures do most of the talking, but here are the details we have so far: The SRPC49K is a blacked-out variant of the Turtle, with a mix of matt and gloss finishes on the 45mm case, and a matching monochromatic bezel. The dial is classic Seiko diver, with the iconic Lumibrite plots, hands and that day/date display. There are the little details we’ve come to expect, like the Suwa ‘sword’ at 12, and the Prospex logo at six, but, really, it’s all about the colour. Orange is the order of the day, and not the sort of high-vis fluro orange you typically get on dive watches (having said that, the minute hand is pretty bright). No, the orange on display here is… Read More

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ANNOUNCING: Seiko release stunning blue enamel dial Seiko Presage SPB069 ‘Moonlit Night’

The name of this watch gives much away about its romantic, dare we even say, poetic roots. Seiko do not usually name their watches. This makes them very difficult to tell your friends about. Unless, of course, you have a beautiful mind, and can rattle off Seiko references. Which describes no one in the Time+Tide team. So, long before we saw any images, when we heard the ‘SPB069’ was going to be named the ‘Moonlit Night’ our interest was piqued. It is inspired, the press release says, by the night sky and “Japan’s fascination with the moon”. It combines “mechanical watchmaking and Japanese craftsmanship in the form of enamel, expressed for the first time in a rich blue dial”. The blue enamel dial is the work of enamel craftsman Mitsuru Yokozawa and his team, who made the white enamel dials that caused us — in colloquial Australian slang — to go completely off ours when we discovered them on other Presage models. Enamel is an exacting art, and blue enamel is particularly difficult as the viscosity is much higher. The skill required to achieve evenness is even more demanding than usual. And due to the small surface area of a watch dial, and… Read More

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HANDS-ON: Everlasting glory – the Seiko Premier Kinetic Perpetual

If you’re a regular reader of Time+Tide it should come as no surprise to learn that I’m a fan of Seiko. Honestly, I think anyone with a more than passing interest in wrist-based timekeeping should be, as there are few brands that offer the sort of vertical integration that the Japanese manufacturer is capable of. If I had to narrow my appreciation for the brand down to two things, I’d have to say it’s their ongoing quest for perpetual accuracy (as evidenced in their innovations in quartz, Spring Drive and Astron technologies), as well as their unique approach to design. Both these traits are very much in evidence on the Premier Kinetic Perpetual, both the steel (SNP139P) and the limited edition Novak Djokovic (SNP146P). As you might have surmised from the headline and the dial layout, this Seiko is a perpetual calendar. And while it’s not an incredibly complex (and expensive) mechanical number, it’s also not a straight-up quartz. Rather, it’s a hybrid of the two – a kinetic – meaning there’s a winding rotor behind the solid caseback that provides power to the quartz movement, which is just jam-packed full of calendar complication: big date, month, leap year and… Read More

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VIDEO: Solar flair – Seiko’s stylish Prospex SSC618P

Dive watches, thanks in part to their function-before-form ideology, can often be, well, formulaic. Seiko’s bold gold SSC618P manages to buck the trend in a few ways. Firstly, and most obviously, they’ve dressed up rugged steel with an unmissable rose gold coating, which must surely increase visibility underwater, as it’s certainly eye-catching on land. Then there’s the fact that this is a dive-ready chronograph, a slightly uncommon combination, but it’s always fun to play with screw-down pushers. And finally there’s the fact that while this Seiko isn’t packing mechanical heat in the backend, the movement is a quite interesting (and useful) solar-powered number. Honestly, this is a 43.5mm chunk of summer fun, that would, just quietly, look killer on a khaki nylon strap. Seiko Prospex SSC618P Australian pricing Seiko Prospex SSC618P, $775

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HANDS-ON: Enamel excellence — the Seiko Presage SPB049J

Seiko drop a LOT of watches at Basel. It’s like a candy store, with everything from super-hot limited editions, to Prospex, to Presage. All there in front of you. And I’m sure I only see a fraction of what’s on offer. It can be overwhelming. But even so, a few watches stand out, and they’re not always the ones you expect. For me, one of those watches was the SPB049J, a sober time-and-date tonneau with a classical dial in enamel. Now, a tonneau, or barrel-shaped case, is relatively uncommon, and can be hard to get right. They tend to veer either to the very sporty, or, in this instance, the very traditional. But something about this watch just works. The dial is, as you’d expect from enamel, light and lustrous, the black printed Roman numerals and text is wonderfully crisp, the ideal backdrop for the leaf-shaped blued steel hands and that seconds hand, with its crescent-moon tipped counterweight. They’re hands I’d happily look at all day long. The only slight jarring note in the dial design is the printed square around the date aperture, which is quite roughly finished around the edges. I don’t mind the border per se, but… Read More

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