Omega is one of the greatest names in watchmaking, famous for walking on the moon, keeping time at the Olympics and for gracing the wrist of 007. They’ve been making some of the most robust, accurate and elegant timepieces on the market since 1848. Find out more about the many sides of Omega at Time+Tide.

VIDEO: Oh boy. Andrew vs Felix in watch rebuild battle at the Omega Service Centre. Watchmakers, look away …

In a battle that’s been brewing since the dawn of Time (and Tide, in 2014), Andrew and Felix finally pick up the tools and take on the challenge of taking apart and then rebuilding a manually wound movement. We lay our scene at the Omega Service Centre in Melbourne, and the occasion is somewhat of a celebration around the announcement that Omega has upgraded its Manufacturer’s Warranty on all watches to a whopping five years — three years longer than the industry’s standard warranty of two years, which is demanded by European law. Unlike most other manufacturers that offer five years warranty on certain models, Omega is offering it on all of them. To prove the importance of servicing, we thought it was an opportune time to reveal the delicate innards of your watch and the expertise you are employing when you have a trained watchmaker see to its servicing. To make it interesting, we thought it would be fun to play watchmakers for a day, while engaging in a deadly serious (lol) rebuild battle across three criteria: speed, efficiency and accuracy. We asked you in a poll who you thought would win. The results were in favour of Felix to the… Read More

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INSIGHT: Omega’s watchmaking in the modern age

In the constant cycle of new releases, it’s easy to lose sight of the fact that watches are machines built to last for generations — with a little regular care and love. And while you and I might be there obsessing over the year’s hottest release, or wondering what’s coming next, Omega takes a longer view. Which is only to be expected, given that over their 170-odd years of history, watchmaking technology has changed quite a bit, and Omega has kept pace with this change, every step of the way. And while in the first half of last century they were busy forging ahead with improving accuracy, automatic movements, and protecting against water and dust, the 21st century heralds new obstacles for mechanical watches, with new solutions. One such solution is the Co-Axial escapement, a more stable and efficient mechanism developed by George Daniels and industrialised by Omega. The first commercial Omega Co-Axials were released in 1999, and quickly became the foundation of Omega’s increasingly impressive and sophisticated in-house offerings. More recently, Omega opened their brand new facility — a significant infrastructure investment that gives them plenty of room to grow. And on top of that, Omega recently announced an… Read More

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HANDS-ON: Seriously fun, the gold and steel Omega Seamaster 300M Diver

I’ve got to say, for a watch born in the middle of the ’90s, the Omega Seamaster 300M Diver is looking pretty glorious. Partially that’s down to the fresh facelift and major internal upgrade, but it goes deeper than that. The SMP — as it’s known — knows what it is, and revels in that identity. And nowhere is that dual nature of flashy meets functionality more evident than this steel and yellow gold beauty. The flashy elements are immediately apparent — it’s hard to miss that striking black and gold bezel, the golden crown and (re-worked) helium escape valve. And then there’s the glossy black dial, laser-engraved with the (in?)famous wave pattern, and it seems like every other surface has been buffed to a high gleam. But there’s substance under the showiness. Starting with the rubber strap — a (very comfortable) choice that immediately signals that this watch means business, and not the suit-and-tie kind. And then the overall build quality is legendary; the dial is super legible and fully loaded with lume. Flip the watch over and, behind the scalloped Naiad lock, the top-notch Calibre 8800 is proudly on display. Because while the oh-so-slightly upsized case size and… Read More

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VIDEO: Oh boy. Andrew vs Felix in watch rebuild battle at the Omega Service Centre. Watchmakers, look away …

In a battle that’s been brewing since the dawn of Time (and Tide, in 2014), Andrew and Felix finally pick up the tools and take on the challenge of taking apart and then rebuilding a manually wound movement. We lay our scene at the Omega Service Centre in Melbourne, and the occasion is somewhat of a celebration around the announcement that Omega has upgraded its Manufacturer’s Warranty on all watches to a whopping five years — three years longer than the industry’s standard warranty of two years, which is demanded by European law. Unlike most other manufacturers that offer five years warranty on certain models, Omega is offering it on all of them. To prove the importance of servicing, we thought it was an opportune time to reveal the delicate innards of your watch and the expertise you are employing when you have a trained watchmaker see to its servicing. To make it interesting, we thought it would be fun to play watchmakers for a day, while engaging in a deadly serious (lol) rebuild battle across three criteria: speed, efficiency and accuracy. We asked you in a poll who you thought would win. The results were in favour of Felix to the… Read More

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MY MONTH WITH: A beaten-up Omega Seamaster 300

A few months ago I ended up wearing the Omega Seamaster 300 for a month or so. Now, unusually for me, this wasn’t a PR sample or anything, but an actual real watch, that I borrowed off a mate who wanted to try one of my watches on for size. Now, I’m typically hesitant to do this, as I would hate something to happen to the watch when it’s in my care. “Don’t worry,” said my mate, “I’m not precious.” Somewhat comforted by these words, I made my way to a local cafe to complete the hand-off. Several coffees and much amiable watch banter later, I walked off with the Omega Seamaster 300 Master Co-Axial (to give it its full name) buckled onto my wrist. My first impression was … jeez, he really wasn’t joking about not being precious — this watch is well-loved. Which is something I don’t get to see too much. The watches I review typically come in box-fresh condition, but that’s not what happens in the real world. Buckles, one of the main points where your watch meets the world, quickly gain a unique, swirled and dented character all their own, and the watch behind tells a tale… Read More

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NEWS: More than Moonwatches – these are the Omegas you can expect to spot in new moon film First Man

If you happen to be a watch fan or a space enthusiast, this Thursday in Australia is the day you’ve been waiting for, with the opening of Universal Pictures’ First Man. Based on the book by James R. Hansen, the movie chronicles the life of Neil Armstrong in the years leading up to the historic Apollo 11 mission to the moon in 1969. It’s directed by Oscar-winning director Damien Chazelle, and stars known watch collector Ryan Gosling. It should come as no surprise then that a movie about the moon landing is also going to be Omega watch-spotting heaven. If you’re into watches (you’re here, so I’m going to assume you are) then you might already know the story of the famed Omega Moonwatch. But if not, I’ll quickly break it down. In 1964, NASA put the call out to the watch brands of the world, searching for a watch that could qualify for use on their manned missions. Officially announcing the Omega Speedmaster as “Flight Qualified for all Manned Space Missions” on March 1, 1965, and beginning the Speedmaster’s journey into space on the wrists of astronauts on the final Mercury missions as well as during the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab… Read More

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VIDEO: Holding the last watch that walked on the moon in your hand (and quietly freaking out)

Nothing hints at the story of a watch more than its imperfections. A thick scratch across the crystal. Could that have been a motorbike accident? A near miss with a switchblade? A ding in the otherwise smooth shoulder of the lugs. Something mundane like an errant car door, or seatbelt buckle on a plane? A particular burnishing to a deployant, suggesting an activity performed daily by the wearer, such as aluminium MacBook Pro scratches in the case of all my watches. No watch imperfections have moved me quite like the ones on this watch that Omega Museum Director Mr Petros Protopapas entrusted to my gloved hand in this extraordinary experience we captured on film. In it, I ask to do exactly that. It’s rather greedy to listen back to. What watch in the museum would I like to see? “Not a watch that was near the moon, or that orbited the moon … one that walked ON the moon.”  The watch he handed me? A NASA-issued Omega Speedmaster ref. ST105.003 that belonged to Eugene ‘Gene’ Cernan, the last man to walk on the moon as the Commander of Apollo 17 in December 1972. I have stolen enough thunder here. I hope you… Read More

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