Omega is one of the greatest names in watchmaking, famous for walking on the moon, keeping time at the Olympics and for gracing the wrist of 007. They’ve been making some of the most robust, accurate and elegant timepieces on the market since 1848. Find out more about the many sides of Omega at Time+Tide.

“It may patina, but it won’t go green.” Omega President sheds more light on Bronze Gold in our Top 5 new Omega video

There were two burning questions I wanted to ask the President of Omega, Mr Raynald Aeschlimann after seeing the new watches that have been revelead in 2021. The first was about the most hotly anticipated reboot of a major model in my time as a watch journalist; the migration of the 3861 movement into the Moonwatch. He treats the question with an appropriate amount of emotion and respect. Considering I’ve been asking when and if this would ever happen to both Raynald and the previous President Mr Stephen Urquhart, it was only fair that it would be answered honestly, without any spin. The second one that was right on the tip of my tongue, was about the brand new ‘Bronze Gold’ Seamaster 300; one of the burning, unresolved queries from the various press conferences was, how will it age? Will it go green like the Pinion watch from a brilliant Fratello story in the featured image, right here? How is this largely gold based alloy going to look in a year, two, three years from now? Raynald was clear on one thing. It. Will. Not. Go. Green. For the rest of the interview, and our view of the top picks… Read More

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5 of the best watches with quick-change strap systems including Vacheron, Omega and Apple

“My name is Thor, and I am a strapaholic.” It’s only a matter of time before I get pulled into some kind of intervention with friends, family and a psychiatrist. I’m surely not the only watch lover who likes to swap my watch straps on a regular basis. But many brands seem to be stuck in the strap-tech stone-age and still rely on the fiddly spring bar that hardly offers a user-friendly way to change straps.  What if we coul just click’em all off and on at our leisure, changing a strap to match up that outfit in 10 seconds flat? Thankfully this vision of the future is, in fact, already upon us with some forward-thinking brands leading the way. Now excuse me while I crawl under the sofa to find that missing spring bar… Omega Seamaster Diver 300m Americas Cup Chronograph For those of you that think the standard Seamaster Diver 300M is a tad vanilla-flavoured, the Omega Seamaster Diver 300M America’s Cup Chronograph offers a brand new look in a fresh oceanic blue pepped up by flashes of red, notably for the countdown indicator at 3 o’clock. The watch introduces a slew of new upgrades we can only… Read More

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The watch that got away… Hear our sob stories and share yours at The Breakfast Club #4 on Clubhouse

watch that got away

Nearly every watch lover will harbour certain regrets. It is inevitable there’s a watch you wished you’d pulled the trigger on – wincing in hindsight that it is not in your collection today. In fact, this is such a relatable aspect of watch collecting that for the fourth weekly meeting of The Breakfast Club on Clubhouse we’ve decided to ask participants to share their own tales of the watch that got away. When it comes to such sob stories, our very own Time+Tide team is no exception. So in anticipation of this week’s meeting, I asked my colleagues to share the watches that slipped through their grasps.  Please join us on Clubhouse (Friday 8pm EST / Saturday 11am AET) as we’d love to hear your tales, too. Thor Svaboe’s watch that got away: Girard Perregaux Laureato 38mm I’m sticking to my top choice of a 38mm Girard Perregaux Laureato. To such an extent that I recently sold my Black Bay 58, and am now waiting for another one to come up for sale at the champagne-for-the-price-of-soda price of the lost one. This Genta entry ticket at 38mm is a great version of the delicately bevelled Girard-Perregaux Laureato. I reviewed one… Read More

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“It may patina, but it won’t go green.” Omega President sheds more light on Bronze Gold in our Top 5 new Omega video

There were two burning questions I wanted to ask the President of Omega, Mr Raynald Aeschlimann after seeing the new watches that have been revelead in 2021. The first was about the most hotly anticipated reboot of a major model in my time as a watch journalist; the migration of the 3861 movement into the Moonwatch. He treats the question with an appropriate amount of emotion and respect. Considering I’ve been asking when and if this would ever happen to both Raynald and the previous President Mr Stephen Urquhart, it was only fair that it would be answered honestly, without any spin. The second one that was right on the tip of my tongue, was about the brand new ‘Bronze Gold’ Seamaster 300; one of the burning, unresolved queries from the various press conferences was, how will it age? Will it go green like the Pinion watch from a brilliant Fratello story in the featured image, right here? How is this largely gold based alloy going to look in a year, two, three years from now? Raynald was clear on one thing. It. Will. Not. Go. Green. For the rest of the interview, and our view of the top picks… Read More

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INTRODUCING: The Omega Seamaster 300 Bronze Gold revolutionizes how bronze wears on the wrist

Omega Seamaster 300 Bronze Gold

Bronze is nothing particularly new to dive watches. For a time now we have seen manufacturers leverage bronze for its history in diving and the precious metal like tone it carries on the wrist. But not all bronze is created equal. While collectors typically prefer natural patina, in favour of forced or faux-patina, Instagram is ripe with shots before and after bronze cases were left to “force age” – going so far as to leave a watch in egg wash to create a “found at the bottom of the sea” aesthetic. In my opinion, however, the grey-green tone that results (known as verdigris-oxidation) is not very desirable. It creates a corrosive look that can completely deaden the precious tone of bronze. While such a corrosive surface layer is known to protect the underlying metal from further corrosion, it can be quite harmful to your skin and even result in turning your wrist green. This is why Omega spent years developing a whole new alloy for the category, the fruits of their labour being the new Omega Seamaster 300 Bronze Gold, with a Bronze-Au375 Gold alloy that both your eyes and skin will appreciate. The beauty here is you get a… Read More

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6 key differences between the new Omega Seamaster 300 and the previous generation

new Omega Seamaster 300 vs old

When it comes to Omega dive watches, the Seamaster 300 is an enthusiast favourite. Yes, the Diver 300M collection is hugely popular, but for those who aren’t after a contemporary design and prefer the softer and more balanced designs of the Omega archives, then the Seamaster 300 is where you may well eventually find yourself. For 2021, the Bienne-based watchmaker has reinvigorated the collection with all new Omega Seamaster 300 references that remain faithful to the original design, but have a few key updates. With that in mind, we wanted to take a closer look at the new Omega Seamaster 300 versus old variations and unpack the key differences. The dial construction  This year the Seamaster 300 has received a totally new dial, both in its construction and in its details (which we’ll get to in a minute). It features what is known as a sandwich dial, which is a first for Omega and basically means that it has two dials sandwiched together to add more visual depth. The baseplate of the dial is German silver, which is coated in vintage-coloured Super-LumiNova, before being covered with the second dial of common bronze which has the hour markers and numerals cut… Read More

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INTRODUCING: The all black everything Omega Seamaster Diver 300m Black Black

Omega Seamaster Diver 300m Black Black

The fan favourite Omega Seamaster Diver 300m is getting more than a facelift in 2021. That’s right, the watch best known for appearing on the wrist of 007 will now be available in full ceramic in the all-new Omega Seamaster Diver 300m Black Black. And that repetition in the name is for emphasis. This watch is very black indeed. The new design keeps the same 43.5mm case size as the other ceramic reference (ref. 210.92.44.20.01.001 on rubber) with 14.47mm thickness, but is slightly larger than the traditional Diver 300m that measures 42mm in diameter. In ceramic, it is a watch you can expect to wear considerably lighter than the typical stainless-steel case construction thanks to the ceramic material, weighing in at 115g or about 20% lighter than in steel. The Omega Master Chronometer Calibre 8806 powering the new ceramic dive watch is consistent with other references within the collection, offering 55 hours of power reserve and magnetic resistance to 15,000 gauss. You might be wondering how you tell the time on a watch that is completely black, but Omega has considered this practicality. The ceramic has been finished variously across the watch, from the case to the dial to the… Read More

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