Omega is one of the greatest names in watchmaking, famous for walking on the moon, keeping time at the Olympics and for gracing the wrist of 007. They’ve been making some of the most robust, accurate and elegant timepieces on the market since 1848. Find out more about the many sides of Omega at Time+Tide.

Long read: Omega De Ville Co-Axial Escapement Limited Edition, a piece of watchmaking history

Omega De Ville Co-Axial Escapement Limited Edition

George Daniels is almost universally recognised as the greatest watchmaker of his lifetime, and even if you haven't heard of him, you might have seen evidence of his work on the dial of millions of Omega watches around the world — the words CO-AXIAL. His most significant contribution to watchmaking was the development of his co-axial escapement, the first serious step forward in watchmaking in more than 200 years, and was first put to work in the Omega De Ville Co-Axial Escapement Limited Edition. That's right, not much had changed in two centuries before Daniels began his work. His co-axial escapement was important because not only did it improve the accuracy of a typical mechanical watch, but it also vastly improved the mechanical efficiency of the movement so that it would need less regular servicing. Legend has it that Daniels woke in the middle of the night with a complete picture of what the escapement would look like, but really it was the cumulative efforts of 20 years of work that led him to develop his invention. In essence, the co-axial escapement was successfully able to eliminate almost all friction between the pallet fork and the escape wheel, an improvement on… Read More

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Why I rely on mechanical watches in the most extreme environments known to man: Victor Vescovo

Victor Vescovo

"To boldly go where no man has gone before …" For most people, that's just a hackneyed line from Star Trek. For Victor Vescovo, it's become a personal mission. Put simply, the American private equity investor is hell-bent on pushing his limits. He's the first man to have reached the deepest points of four of the Earth's five oceans, plumbing a world record depth of 10,925 metres when he made it to the bottom of the Challenger Deep last year. Having previously summited Everest, the 54-year-old is now the only man to have ever travelled to the planet's starkest extremities. But the two experiences were wildly different, Victor explains. "Climbing Everest is such a visceral, almost violent experience, because it's such punishment for your body, physically and mentally. When you get to the summit, you get this massive sense of relief and accomplishment. But the sense of danger is also there because you still have to get down. "Getting to the bottom of the Challenger Deep wasn't anywhere near as physically intense because I was safely cocooned in a titanium sphere. But mentally it was much more insidious. That came from knowing that I was so far down. I went down… Read More

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Restoring my Great-Grandfather's Omega Seamaster

Omega Seamaster

We all have those knick-knacks lying around that get forgotten. Dried-up sharpies, matchboxes, and screwdrivers are the common offenders in my household, however there had always been one outlier. A small, unassuming wristwatch had been sitting in an antique drawer for at least 20 years.  Freshly into my 20s, I landed a job that meant I couldn't have my phone on me for the length of the shift, and there was hardly a clock in sight. I had the very new issue of a watch being a necessity, so I went and found the cheapest watch I could get. After two weeks, what had cost $10 became worthless when the hour, minute and seconds hands all snapped off. Suddenly, I remembered the stopped watch in the drawer. To my surprise, when I rummaged it out of the mess of cables and foreign coins, I actually recognised the brand. An Omega Seamaster. Although I knew little about it, I knew it was special. I asked my dad if he remembered any details, and he said my great-grandfather had bought it. That's about it. Being a DIY-oriented person, I launched myself into research in an attempt to fix it. I quickly realised… Read More

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Long read: Omega De Ville Co-Axial Escapement Limited Edition, a piece of watchmaking history

Omega De Ville Co-Axial Escapement Limited Edition

George Daniels is almost universally recognised as the greatest watchmaker of his lifetime, and even if you haven't heard of him, you might have seen evidence of his work on the dial of millions of Omega watches around the world — the words CO-AXIAL. His most significant contribution to watchmaking was the development of his co-axial escapement, the first serious step forward in watchmaking in more than 200 years, and was first put to work in the Omega De Ville Co-Axial Escapement Limited Edition. That's right, not much had changed in two centuries before Daniels began his work. His co-axial escapement was important because not only did it improve the accuracy of a typical mechanical watch, but it also vastly improved the mechanical efficiency of the movement so that it would need less regular servicing. Legend has it that Daniels woke in the middle of the night with a complete picture of what the escapement would look like, but really it was the cumulative efforts of 20 years of work that led him to develop his invention. In essence, the co-axial escapement was successfully able to eliminate almost all friction between the pallet fork and the escape wheel, an improvement on… Read More

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Why I put my own money behind the Omega Seamaster Diver 300M

Omega Seamaster Diver 300M

It was during a particularly cold snap in January that I decided to get off the couch and out of the house. I was restless. The internet had been bombarding me with watch photos, opinions, reviews and advertising. I'm quite sure the only Google algorithm pointed at me is for watches. On that frigid January evening all these influences conspired to push me toward the mall (which is a recognised natural habitat for most Canadians in the winter months). Luckily, as everyone else had stayed home, I had near-exclusive access to a great boutique which housed an impressive selection of my favourite watch brands. The sales rep was extremely patient with me and after much head scratching, it was down to two Omegas: the relatively new Seamaster Diver 300M and the venerable Speedmaster Moonwatch, both of which are priced within $300 of each other on a bracelet. If you haven't already, you can read right here about some of the reasons it's hard for me to buy a Speedy; however, I have to say, the Seamaster Diver simply charmed the wallet out of my pocket. The model I purchased was released in 2018 as an overhaul of the early 1990s… Read More

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WATCH DISASTERS #2: This is why you shouldn't drown your Omega in Berocca

Wear and tear often bolsters the appeal of a vintage watch. Picture a chronograph dial aged to a warm tropical hue, or a pilot's watch overshadowed with caramel patina. Rather than signs of decay, such well-worn details are celebrated as adding character and authenticity. Like the laughter lines on an old man's face, they're testimony to a life well-lived. Yet there are limits … It wasn't an expensive watch. I'd picked up my Omega Seamaster about 20 years ago in Melbourne's Block Arcade. Hailing from the 1950s, this was a pleasantly discreet timepiece, a steel-cased dress watch with gold hands and hour markers. Subbing out the leather strap for a NATO number, I wore it almost every day. Its untimely demise was hastened by the type of self-sabotaging hi-jinks that only blight your life when you're an excitable 20-something and it's the Friday night of a long weekend. The specifics of the evening's shenanigans thankfully remain hazy. But it involved half a dozen bars and a godawful drum and bass club (where I somehow lost my phone), before I eventually stumbled back to my Sydney apartment just before 5am. Eventually surfacing in the early afternoon, I padded around the flat… Read More

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Space odyssey: How the Omega Calibre 321 became the first watch movement on the moon

first watch movement on the moon

In many ways, outer space and space exploration have become a routine part of life. We all carry a device that listens to signals from space in the form of our mobile phone. Most can receive messages from GPS satellites in medium earth orbit more than 20,000km away. Just as space is now entwined with our lives, so is timekeeping inseparable from space. GPS relies upon clocks. A satellite sends a signal that says "I sent this at time X." Your phone provides the time, Y, when the signal was received. The elapsed time between sending and receiving (Y minus X seconds) when combined with the known speed of the signal (Z km/s, from physics) reveals your distance from the satellite ( (Y-X)*Z). If your distance from three satellites is determined, your location can be trilateralated. The three distances are the diameter of three unique circles, each with a GPS satellite at its centre. Those three circles intersect at only one point and that point is your location.  What is truly remarkable about timekeeping and outer space is that when astronauts are in this treacherous vacuum they typically employ a mechanical device to mark the time. No circuitry, no battery,… Read More

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