Omega is one of the greatest names in watchmaking, famous for walking on the moon, keeping time at the Olympics and for gracing the wrist of 007. They’ve been making some of the most robust, accurate and elegant timepieces on the market since 1848. Find out more about the many sides of Omega at Time+Tide.

MY WEEK WITH: The Omega Speedmaster CK 2998

As far as famous watches go, the Speedmaster is way up there. And aside from its famous extraterrestrial exploits, it’s also a real staple of the watch world, which is why a Speedy was a natural choice of wrist wear for my recent Swiss trip. The fact that this trip included spending some quality time with Omega only sealed the deal. The next question was: which Speedmaster? Well, in the end, my decision wasn’t too hard, because even though you’re spoiled for choice, I wanted a more classical iteration, and one with a mix of personality and versatility. So I plumped for the 2018 limited edition, the CK 2998. Once I put it on, it felt … pleasingly petite. It measures 39.7mm across, so it’s not really too small, but thanks to that broad black bezel, it wears smaller than you’d expect. It’s also, thanks to the manual winder inside, thinner than the automatic chronographs I typically road test. It’s a nice-feeling watch; present, but certainly not overpowering. Looks-wise … it’s vintage, but not too vintage if you take my meaning. In case you’re not familiar, the CK 2998 is based on the first Omega in space, a 2998 worn… Read More

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INTRODUCING: The Omega Seamaster Diver 300M in ceramic and titanium, with no date

One of the most exciting watches of last year was the significantly revamped Omega Seamaster Diver 300M, a modern icon of the brand that managed to sneak into both Andrew’s and my own ‘best of 2018’ lists (so it must be good). Well, the SMP just got a little bit better — Omega has announced a new version, in an oh-so-sexy looking black ceramic case, topped off with a titanium bezel with a matching black ceramic insert. This is a watch case that really works with ceramic: the complex shapes (like those lyre lugs) and mix of brushed and polished surfaces really amp up the ceramic-ness. The crown, escape valve and caseback are all titanium, like the bezel, which adds a little bit of muted contrast to the affair. The strap is rubber, and the buckle ceramic. Even that glossy, wavy dial is ceramic — and — in an exciting move for the purists out there, there’s no date window, ensuring the look is as stealthy as possible. The other interesting news is that this model is a shade larger than last year’s metal offerings; it measures in at 43.5mm. As the name would suggest, it’s rated at 300 metres,… Read More

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INTRODUCING: A vision in red – the brand new Omega De Ville Trésor 125th Anniversary Special Edition

It’s well known that Omega loves an anniversary, but the one that I’m currently celebrating with them in Bienne is quite significant. This year marks 125 years since the Calibre Omega — a 19-ligne movement that was so significant that, a few years after its debut in 1894, the company changed its name to the Omega Watch Company in 1903, and the rest, as they say, is history. But what made the Calibre so significant that it earned the declarative moniker of Omega — the last letter of the Greek alphabet — and the ‘ultimate’ achievement in watchmaking? Well, this calibre matters because it was innovative — it was awarded a patent for setting and winding via the crown, but more than that it mattered because it was the first serially produced movement, a movement that was not only produced using an industrial production line method, but it also meant that parts were produced very precisely, and thus interchangeable or replaceable. We might take it for granted now, but whenever you drop your watch in for a routine service, you owe a small debt to the Omega Calibre. To celebrate this achievement, Omega has released two very special watches. The… Read More

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MY WEEK WITH: The Omega Speedmaster CK 2998

As far as famous watches go, the Speedmaster is way up there. And aside from its famous extraterrestrial exploits, it’s also a real staple of the watch world, which is why a Speedy was a natural choice of wrist wear for my recent Swiss trip. The fact that this trip included spending some quality time with Omega only sealed the deal. The next question was: which Speedmaster? Well, in the end, my decision wasn’t too hard, because even though you’re spoiled for choice, I wanted a more classical iteration, and one with a mix of personality and versatility. So I plumped for the 2018 limited edition, the CK 2998. Once I put it on, it felt … pleasingly petite. It measures 39.7mm across, so it’s not really too small, but thanks to that broad black bezel, it wears smaller than you’d expect. It’s also, thanks to the manual winder inside, thinner than the automatic chronographs I typically road test. It’s a nice-feeling watch; present, but certainly not overpowering. Looks-wise … it’s vintage, but not too vintage if you take my meaning. In case you’re not familiar, the CK 2998 is based on the first Omega in space, a 2998 worn… Read More

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HANDS-ON: The Omega Speedmaster Dark Side of the Moon Apollo 8

Before we get into the meat of this, it goes without saying that there’s no love lost between me and the average Omega Speedy. Yes, I absolutely have to (and do) respect their history, what they have done for the mainstream popularity of quality watchmaking, and so forth … but, generally speaking (with the exception of the MkII and a handful of more obscure references), the countless modern references of Speedmaster out there just don’t do anything for me. But then I saw the Apollo 8 and thought, “OK, maybe ONE more version won’t be the end of the world …” The Apollo 8, from the get-go, is my kind of odd duck. Between its unique partially cutaway dial, bright yellow accents, a ceramic case, a specially modified hand-winding calibre, there’s a lot going on here that ensures this piece isn’t your average Speedmaster dial variation. Its design is a tribute to the Apollo 8 mission that orbited the moon, and, as you can see from the imagery, there’s a lot of “moon-ness” to its design. Though it’s still a larger 44.25mm diameter case — a far cry from the more svelte OG Speedies — it is a touch thinner than… Read More

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VIDEO: Oh boy. Andrew vs Felix in watch rebuild battle at the Omega Service Centre. Watchmakers, look away …

In a battle that’s been brewing since the dawn of Time (and Tide, in 2014), Andrew and Felix finally pick up the tools and take on the challenge of taking apart and then rebuilding a manually wound movement. We lay our scene at the Omega Service Centre in Melbourne, and the occasion is somewhat of a celebration around the announcement that Omega has upgraded its Manufacturer’s Warranty on all watches to a whopping five years — three years longer than the industry’s standard warranty of two years, which is demanded by European law. Unlike most other manufacturers that offer five years warranty on certain models, Omega is offering it on all of them. To prove the importance of servicing, we thought it was an opportune time to reveal the delicate innards of your watch and the expertise you are employing when you have a trained watchmaker see to its servicing. To make it interesting, we thought it would be fun to play watchmakers for a day, while engaging in a deadly serious (lol) rebuild battle across three criteria: speed, efficiency and accuracy. We asked you in a poll who you thought would win. The results were in favour of Felix to the… Read More

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INSIGHT: Omega’s watchmaking in the modern age

In the constant cycle of new releases, it’s easy to lose sight of the fact that watches are machines built to last for generations — with a little regular care and love. And while you and I might be there obsessing over the year’s hottest release, or wondering what’s coming next, Omega takes a longer view. Which is only to be expected, given that over their 170-odd years of history, watchmaking technology has changed quite a bit, and Omega has kept pace with this change, every step of the way. And while in the first half of last century they were busy forging ahead with improving accuracy, automatic movements, and protecting against water and dust, the 21st century heralds new obstacles for mechanical watches, with new solutions. One such solution is the Co-Axial escapement, a more stable and efficient mechanism developed by George Daniels and industrialised by Omega. The first commercial Omega Co-Axials were released in 1999, and quickly became the foundation of Omega’s increasingly impressive and sophisticated in-house offerings. More recently, Omega opened their brand new facility — a significant infrastructure investment that gives them plenty of room to grow. And on top of that, Omega recently announced an… Read More

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