Omega is one of the greatest names in watchmaking, famous for walking on the moon, keeping time at the Olympics and for gracing the wrist of 007. They’ve been making some of the most robust, accurate and elegant timepieces on the market since 1848. Find out more about the many sides of Omega at Time+Tide.

IN-DEPTH: The Omega Speedmaster Racing Master Chronometer

The story in a second: Maybe it didn’t get to the moon, but this Speedmaster still excites. Earlier this week, we ran a video review of the black-dialled Omega Speedmaster Racing Master Chronometer. Well, we liked it so much we thought we’d go into a little more detail, with the very different feeling grey-dialled version. The case It’s a Speedmaster, so no real surprises with the case. It looks and feels much like every other Speedmaster, except for its contemporary dimensions: it clocks in larger than your regular Speedy, at a not insubstantial 44.25mm wide, but it wears well, and sits comfortably on the wrist, thanks to a very reasonable sub-15mm height. The case is mostly brushed, with the exception of that sinuous polished line that stretches from lug-tip to lug-tip, adding an air of elegance to an otherwise utilitarian case. The dial Speaking of elegance, this dial variation is by far the dandiest. The black we showed you earlier is an undeniable classic, and there’s a white version, but this sunburst grey number is the real winner in my books. And not just because the grey is so mutable in the light. No, what really sets this dial apart… Read More

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VIDEO: The Omega Speedmaster Racing Master Chronometer gets our motor running

Given how synonymous Omega’s Speedmaster is with space in general and the moon in particular, it’s quite easy to forget that the watch was originally designed with motorsports in mind. This year, Omega set out to remind us that the Speedmaster does not always equal Moonwatch, with the Speedmaster Racing Master Chronometer, a big, 44.5mm dual register automatic that honours the spirit of the Speedy, but also spices things up with numerous automotive touches. Starting with the perforated racing strap, with flashes of orange peeking out from between the lining. Then there’s the high-vis orange highlights on the dial, and finally, the roulette-style alternating minute track, which improves legibility (and coolness) by at least 20 per cent. With the Speedmaster Racing, Omega has taken an already winning engine and, once again, fine-tuned it for optimal performance. Omega Speedmaster Racing Master Chronometer Australian pricing Omega Speedmaster Racing Master Chronometer, steel on leather, $11,300

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IN-DEPTH: The Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Master Chronometer

The story in a second: This year the Aqua Terra received a major upgrade, and now we’re seeing Omega’s staple in a whole new light. Since it first surfaced in 2003, Omega’s Aqua Terra has been a versatile everyman, stylish and sartorial, but tough enough for the real world. This year the collection levelled-up to Master Chronometer status and we thought we’d take this sparkly 41mm rubberclad model for a spin. The case The case of the Aqua Terra hasn’t changed too obviously, it’s still the same classic shape, with sporty, swooping, twisted lugs and polished surfaces aplenty. It’s a combination of casual style and dressy finish that helps the Aqua Terra’s chameleon-factor. All models are offered in 38 or 41mm widths, a slight reduction from the previous generation, in line with changing tastes and sized  to please pretty much everyone. One change you might notice is the crown. Omega have flared it ever so slightly, giving it a more conical shape, simply to improve the ergonomics, which was apparently an issue on older versions. I don’t have much personal experience on that front, but I had no issues with this one. The dial The most obvious cosmetic changes have… Read More

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IN-DEPTH: The Omega Speedmaster Racing Master Chronometer

The story in a second: Maybe it didn’t get to the moon, but this Speedmaster still excites. Earlier this week, we ran a video review of the black-dialled Omega Speedmaster Racing Master Chronometer. Well, we liked it so much we thought we’d go into a little more detail, with the very different feeling grey-dialled version. The case It’s a Speedmaster, so no real surprises with the case. It looks and feels much like every other Speedmaster, except for its contemporary dimensions: it clocks in larger than your regular Speedy, at a not insubstantial 44.25mm wide, but it wears well, and sits comfortably on the wrist, thanks to a very reasonable sub-15mm height. The case is mostly brushed, with the exception of that sinuous polished line that stretches from lug-tip to lug-tip, adding an air of elegance to an otherwise utilitarian case. The dial Speaking of elegance, this dial variation is by far the dandiest. The black we showed you earlier is an undeniable classic, and there’s a white version, but this sunburst grey number is the real winner in my books. And not just because the grey is so mutable in the light. No, what really sets this dial apart… Read More

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VIDEO: The Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra – is it the only watch you need? 

One of the secrets of the Omega Aqua Terra’s success is its versatile charm. In its dark-dialled and gold incarnations it’s super dressed-up, but put it on a leather or rubber strap and it becomes a much more casual proposition. This is a watch that could pull tuxedo duty or go with board shorts (and the 150 metres of water resistance means it’s safe to take swimming) with equal ease. But no matter how you wear it, you won’t find it boring. The flash of the polished hands and applied indices ensure that, as does the shimmering, patterned dial. And then, of course, there are its more functional charms. It’s now a Master Chronometer-certified watch, which means that it is tough and accurate, and, in the larger size, has a nifty quick jump hour that’s super useful for travellers. Flexible style and feature-packed? That’s why we think the Omega Aqua Terra is one of the best contenders for ‘only watch’ status we’ve seen this year.

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VIDEO: Get ready for summer with the new Omega Aqua Terra on rubber

I didn’t appreciate just how good the new Master Chronometer Omega Aqua Terras were until I spent some proper time with them. And now that I have, I’m kicking myself for not talking more about them at and after Basel. What’s not to like? The design manages to be current and sporty without losing sight of its classic roots, there’s oodles of cool tech under the hood and it looks stellar on the wrist, thanks to all those facets, edges and polished surfaces. But what really won me over was – wait for it – the rubber strap. Yep, Omega have taken a part of a watch that’s usually an afterthought, and elevated it to (almost) an art form. It’s comfortable and functional but, more than that, it’s cool, thanks to the woven print reminiscent of the so-called tropic straps, and the metal end link really helps give this version of the Aqua Terra a sportier edge than its brethren on metal or leather. Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 150M Australian pricing Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 150M, Master Chronometer, on rubber, $7250

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RECOMMENDED READING: Omega’s CEO on China and the incredible ‘Building O’

Earlier this week The New York Times published an interview with Omega CEO Raynald Aeschlimann, in which he gives an interesting overview as to how the Swatch Group’s crown jewel is faring, and what the plans are for the future. Aeschlimann points to China as a star performing market at the moment, saying that half of the brand’s business is coming from Asia, where the Constellation is the model of choice. He also speaks about the new factory, the impressive ‘Building O’: “At the center of Building O is a giant glass-enclosed atrium three floors deep, an inventory area called ‘the heart’, with 30,000 stacked boxes of watch parts that are retrieved as needed by a roving automated arm.” Omega projects that this massive 175,225-square-foot building will be big enough for another 30-50 years of growth. Read the full story here.

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