Omega is one of the greatest names in watchmaking, famous for walking on the moon, keeping time at the Olympics and for gracing the wrist of 007. They’ve been making some of the most robust, accurate and elegant timepieces on the market since 1848. Find out more about the many sides of Omega at Time+Tide.

RECOMMENDED READING: Omega are making us thirsty with this Casamigos Planet Ocean

Most of the time we’re OK living in Australia. We’ve got great beaches, a laidback culture and some colloquial slang that’s more colourful than a hatful of rainbow bezels.  But sometimes we feel we’re missing out. And today is one of those days. When we spotted this article on Uncrate about a US boutique-only Omega LE, we felt the thirst. And not just because it’s a collab between Omega and their best pal Clooney’s spirits company Casamigos. No, this watch, in matt black ceramic on sailcloth with teal text, has us feeling all sorts of things.  You can feel them too, over at Uncrate. 

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INTRODUCING: The Omega De Ville Trésor 40mm in Sedna gold with grey enamel dial 

When the time came to see Omega’s 2019 collection I was pretty sure I knew what I was going to see, and what I was going to like. Speedmasters (obvs) and Seamasters mostly. And to be fair, I was not disappointed. But I was surprised. I was surprised by some very nice new additions to Omega’s thin, manually wound Trésor family. Specifically this Sedna gold number with a grey enamel dial.  I had seen this watch’s red-dialled sister earlier this year, and while it was nice, it was also a fairly flashy, esoteric piece. This watch, while similar from a specs point of view, is something else entirely. Subtle, elegant, and with not a single extraneous element. The 40mm case is very nicely sized (it could easily go smaller too), and thin at just under 11mm high. The case is simple, as are the applied batons (double batons at 12, 3, 6 and 9), with minute plots between. The Sedna gold plays really beautifully with that dark grey enamel, contrasting in colour, but matching in terms of sheen and lustre.  The view is impressive from the rear, too: the Master Co-Axial 8928 features a Sedna gold balance bridge that’s missing… Read More

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Bringing one of the most badly abused Omega Speedmasters we’ve ever seen back from the dead

It takes a lot of physical abuse to make a watch as iconic as an Omega Speedmaster verge on unrecognisable. But the owner of this watch tried. When photos of a badly beaten 1969 Omega Speedmaster started doing the rounds on Instagram, it had our immediate attention. So many questions: What the hell are ‘welding warts’? And what are they doing all over the case and pushers? What kind of monster does this to a Speedy, or any watch? And, most importantly, what kind of a maniac would take on a restoration project like this in the first place? “He was merciless. For him, the Speedy was not a status symbol, [or a] collector’s item, he could not care less about Omega or Moon missions, landings or space exploration. He just loved it, full stop.” To answer those questions in turn, welding warts are blobs of hardened solder, and they usually coat the area around where a welder is doing their work, and whatever is on their person. The monster who did this is indeed a welder. And the lunatic that agreed to try to restore the watch is Australian watchmaker Nick Hacko. We contacted him as soon as the… Read More

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RECOMMENDED READING: Omega are making us thirsty with this Casamigos Planet Ocean

Most of the time we’re OK living in Australia. We’ve got great beaches, a laidback culture and some colloquial slang that’s more colourful than a hatful of rainbow bezels.  But sometimes we feel we’re missing out. And today is one of those days. When we spotted this article on Uncrate about a US boutique-only Omega LE, we felt the thirst. And not just because it’s a collab between Omega and their best pal Clooney’s spirits company Casamigos. No, this watch, in matt black ceramic on sailcloth with teal text, has us feeling all sorts of things.  You can feel them too, over at Uncrate. 

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INTRODUCING: The Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean Chronograph

The Seamaster Planet Ocean, with its bright orange details, is a favourite in the modern Omega lineup, a compelling combination of brightness and brown. And now we’ve been treated to a brand new version. First of all, this watch is large: 45.5mm across, and  tall on the wrist. It’s also heavy thanks to the steel case. If you really want to double down on the weight, there’s a steel bracelet option, which sees the entire package weigh a hefty 260 grams. If that sounds a little too intense, there are options on a NATO strap — Omega is offering two different bright 5-stripe straps, which are lovely. The other notable new feature is the orange ceramic. The colour is less bold than previous iterations, as adding certain colours to ceramic is notoriously difficult. To my eye, it’s more of a burnt orange — perhaps even pumpkin. It’s an attractive look. The design of the bezel has been updated to bring it in line with the third-generation PO bezel designs, with all the salient numerals and hash marks filled with white liquid ceramic and Super-LumiNova. Finally, there’s the dial. The soft, matt grey dial is a nice foil for the shiny, bright… Read More

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INTRODUCING: The Omega Speedmaster Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Limited Edition in steel (with a bit of gold)

Earlier in the year, Omega celebrated 50 years of Man stepping off our terrestrial sphere with the release of a very faithful reissue of the 1969 commemorative gold Speedmaster (even though the alloy itself is very new). But everyone kind of figured that wouldn’t be the only celebratory Speedy to step out of the brand’s Bienne factory. And everyone was right. Meet the Omega Speedmaster Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Limited Edition in a steel case. Now, though the 42mm case is traditional steel, the bezel is Moonshine gold, Omega’s new, more muted take on traditional yellow gold. But the special touches don’t end there. The dial is grey in the centre and black at the edge, there’s a nice Moonshine gold ’11’ on the dial instead of the usual baton, and a rendering of Buzz Aldrin climbing out of the landing module at nine. The subdial is also Moonshine gold that’s been blackened and laser-engraved. The caseback shows that famous footprint, and hidden behind it is the new 3861 calibre, a Master Chronometer certified version of the classic 861. The other major visual difference is the bracelet, which is a modern interpretation of a vintage bracelet. The links are flat,… Read More

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My pick of the 6 best new Omega watches for 2019, fresh from Time to Move

Omega, as you would expect from the Swatch Group powerhouse, had a panoply of new watches on display at Time to Move. We were treated to a total of 67 new watches (often minor variations in case/dial/etc, but still), and two special vintage pieces thrown in for good measure. Suffice to say there’s a lot to get through, and that will happen over the course of the year. But here’s my hot take on the best Omega watches for 2019: Omega Seamaster Diver 300M Ceramic Titanium We were expecting updates to last year’s hero, the Seamaster Diver 300M, and we were not disappointed. There’s a ceramic and titanium version, with a larger 43.5mm case (which apparently wears smaller), no date, and hands in PVD-coated titanium. All these tweaks to the norm are because this watch is intended to be more tool-like in its aesthetic. $11,100 AUD Omega Speedmaster Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Limited Edition There was a lot of expectation riding on this one, fuelled in no small part by the exceptional gold tribute released earlier in the year. This steel 50th anniversary piece is distinguished by Moonshine gold details, a tiny illustration at nine, a nifty solid caseback and… Read More

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