Longines trace their origins back to 1832, and the values of tradition, elegance and performance are key to the brands identity and design. This year, Longines are celebrating their 185th anniversary with the 'On This Day' campaign – to find out what happened in Longines' history, click here. We are telling our favourite stories too, with the 'Longines Time Machine' video series.

IN-DEPTH: The Longines Conquest V.H.P. GMT “Flash Setting”

The story in a second: A rare case of quartz having legit enthusiast appeal, albeit in a clever, and very novel, fashion. Say “it’s quartz” and countless watch nerds cringe; however, there have been some exceptions to the rule over the years. Of course, Grand Seiko Spring Drive calibers get a pass on account of the brand’s epic design and finishing, as well as the fact that they run a quartz oscillator in the place of the balance wheel, but everything else is done mechanically (to state things as simply as we can). And then there’s the F.P. Journe Elegante 48, which is a completely different animal. Longines has also been toiling away in the battery-powered department, and their V.H.P. calibers, which were refreshed in 2017, carry with them some impressive specifications. Accurate to +/-5 seconds per year, Longines integrated a special functionality to these calibers that allows for internal correction for magnetism or shock via a “gear position sensor” that effectively can tell if things are out of whack and adjust the caliber as required. Weird, but clever for sure. With the GMT Flash Setting model, the brand pushed a step further and have basically created the most idiot-proof… Read More

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NEWS: Longines opens first Melbourne boutique on Collins Street, and these are our 5 picks that are in-store right now

The Australian watch retail landscape has been booming recently, with plenty of new boutique openings. The latest is Longines, which has just opened a 174-square metre store with a prime position in the heart of Collins Street, Melbourne’s premier luxury shopping strip. And while the look and feel of a new boutique is always cool (and given that it’s Longines, this one will be elegant too), really, when a new boutique opens, we’re primarily interested in one thing: Watches. So here are our five picks … The Heritage 1945 Longines is justifiably famous for their heritage collection, and this cinnamon-strapped little beauty does not disappoint, with its faithful design and rich details making it a compelling proposition. The V.H.P. Chronograph The incredibly precise quartz movement inside the V.H.P. is about as far from heritage as you can get. There are numerous proprietary tweaks inside that make this watch best-in-class when it comes to accuracy. The HydroConquest The modern dive watch is a true staple, and Longines HydroConquest is a great example. The stalwart diver received an upgrade this year, with a redesigned dial and a fresh new ceramic bezel. The Avigation Type A 1935 If you like your watches vintage,… Read More

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VIDEO: The Longines Heritage Military

Watches inspired by military designs are a perennial favourite. Largely, that’s down to the fact that these watches generally possess an overarching purpose. These watches have been designed, first and foremost, as functional objects. The Longines Heritage Military, for example, is a no-frills whistle that tells the time, and tells it quickly, clearly and simply. Of course, that purity of purpose typically flows down to a purity of design, and the Heritage Military — with its clear railroad minute track and simple Arabic numerals, its large, easy to manipulate crown and decorative-yet-functional hands — is exemplary. However, that’s not to say that Longines hasn’t added some contemporary design flourish to their historically inspired piece. Look at the dial. It’s a near-perfect facsimile of a decades-old dial that bears the signs and the patina of a life well lived. However, this dial is brand new. It’s also unique. As a result of the production process, each pattern of flecks and marks on the dial is individual to the watch, which is pretty cool. Longines Heritage Military Australian pricing Longines Heritage Military, $2775

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IN-DEPTH: The Longines Conquest V.H.P. GMT “Flash Setting”

The story in a second: A rare case of quartz having legit enthusiast appeal, albeit in a clever, and very novel, fashion. Say “it’s quartz” and countless watch nerds cringe; however, there have been some exceptions to the rule over the years. Of course, Grand Seiko Spring Drive calibers get a pass on account of the brand’s epic design and finishing, as well as the fact that they run a quartz oscillator in the place of the balance wheel, but everything else is done mechanically (to state things as simply as we can). And then there’s the F.P. Journe Elegante 48, which is a completely different animal. Longines has also been toiling away in the battery-powered department, and their V.H.P. calibers, which were refreshed in 2017, carry with them some impressive specifications. Accurate to +/-5 seconds per year, Longines integrated a special functionality to these calibers that allows for internal correction for magnetism or shock via a “gear position sensor” that effectively can tell if things are out of whack and adjust the caliber as required. Weird, but clever for sure. With the GMT Flash Setting model, the brand pushed a step further and have basically created the most idiot-proof… Read More

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VIDEO: The Longines Skin Diver Watch

Longines heritage reissues are — much like the designs they’re inspired by — the stuff of legend. And speaking of legends, you might notice that the dial design of the Skin Diver resembles that of the Legend, with distinctive hand sets and long hour and minute markers. That’s because both watches trace their origin back to the Nautilus Skin Diver, Longines’ first dive watch. But while the Legend has an internal bezel, the bezel here is very much your traditional bezel, and black to boot. This, combined with the creamy-toned printing and rich, almost pebbly dial texture (offered on either a tropic style rubber or Milanese mesh) adds up to a watch that more than lives up to its heritage. Also, you’ll be happy to note: no date window. Longines Skin Diver Watch Australian pricing Longines Skin Diver Watch, $3425

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NEWS: Imagine finding this in your pocket – Longines discover their oldest watch to date

There are few brands that take as much pride in their heritage as Longines. Not surprising, really, when you consider that the winged hourglass brand pioneered the way for the reissue. In fact, the Saint-Imier manufacturer is so proud of their history that their own museum is home to more than 10,000 historic pieces, while the brand also routinely holds competitions around the world in search of their oldest watches. Until recently, that honour fell to the 335th piece produced by Longines, but now, with the help of a dedicated Japanese-American collector, Longines have found a pocket watch with the serial number 183, dating the “savonnette” type silver pocket watch to the year 1867. A big year for Longines, 1867 was not only the same year that Longines began manufacturing their components under a single roof in their brand-new factory in the long meadows that the brand is named for, but also the year they began consecutively numbering the watches they produced. It was this system, as well as the brand’s diligent archiving of information, that made it possible for their historians and watchmakers to establish exactly when the pocket watch was made. Identifying it as one of the very… Read More

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VIDEO: What makes a travel watch? Exploring Rome with the Longines Conquest V.H.P. GMT Flash Setting 

A few weeks ago I travelled to Rome to check out the Longines Conquest V.H.P. GMT Flash Setting, a GMT not like any other. And in between the first-look video, horse racing and spectacular rooftop launches, we thought we’d do some sightseeing around Rome and put the V.H.P. GMT through its paces as a travel watch. Now, of all the ‘genres’ of watches, the travel watch is one of the most subjective. There’s no handy ISO standard to hold it against, nor is there a clearly established design tradition. There’s only subjective taste. With that little caveat out of the way, I’d be quite comfortable putting my money where my mouth is and saying that this Longines Conquest V.H.P. GMT Flash Setting is a near-perfect travel watch for the 21st century. Why? Well, first of all, it looks good. It’s stylistically versatile — important if you’re on the road with one watch and need it to cover a range of sartorial duties. It’s also not too flashy. I don’t know about you, but I don’t want to be traipsing strange corners of the globe, in unfamiliar places where I don’t speak the language, in a watch that might stand out… Read More

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