Longines trace their origins back to 1832, and the values of tradition, elegance and performance are key to the brands identity and design. This year, Longines are celebrating their 185th anniversary with the 'On This Day' campaign – to find out what happened, click here for the Longines' history. We are telling our favourite stories too, with the 'Longines Time Machine' video series.

IN-DEPTH: The Longines HydroConquest 41mm in Khaki Green, a value proposition like few others

Right now, the dive watch market is more saturated than a saturation diver's wetsuit. If you want a fit-for-purpose timepiece made to withstand the pressures and perils of H20, you are most definitely spoilt for choice. Of course, it's understandable why watches that aren't going to completely capitulate when coming into contact with water are so popular – it's a very desirable feature. But it can be daunting trying to separate the good from the bad and, more importantly, trying to understand the gulf between the inexpensive and the very expensive. That last point is something that I think about a lot. And matters haven't exactly been simplified since I started wearing this new Longines HydroConquest in Khaki Green. In fact, this watch has well and truly muddied the waters. Here is a timepiece with no less than 300 metres of water resistance, a self-winding movement, ceramic bezel, solid build quality, arresting presentation and it comes from one of the oldest and best watchmakers in the game … and it costs $2325 AUD. Normally with these types of stories, we like to bury the lead somewhat, keeping readers in suspense until the very end. But, in the case of this… Read More

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The Longines Conquest V.H.P. Collection now comes on a leather strap, here's a collection review from the Sydney QVB Longines Boutique

Longines Conquest V.H.P.

What a difference two years makes. In 2018, I introduced this until now unpublished video by saying that — shock, horror — we were reviewing a collection of watches with quartz movements: the new Longines V.H.P. Collection. I'd go as far as to say it makes me grimace a little to watch in 2020. Because since then, the advancement of quartz back into luxury watchmaking has been steady and it has occurred with less and less resistance. Grand Seiko has been driving the change, as some YouTube commenters have already picked up on. Personally, I now own two modern-era quartz watches. A Longines Conquest V.H.P. and a Grand Seiko GMT SBGN005G, which remains a spectacular experience, every time it gets on the wrist. So, moving on, we're not quite sure how this "lost video" happened. Because looking at it now, it's a long and detailed review about the highly feted Longines V.H.P. Collection that absolutely should have seen the light of YouTube. At the time, despite the preamble, we were quickly won over by the V.H.P. for its technical smarts. But a big part of the charm, for me, was the peculiar and bold colourway of the Commonwealth Games Edition…. Read More

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Are mil-spec watches the perfect weekend warriors?

Dirty Dozen Longines Greenlander

Editor's note: Few other types of watches have transitioned so well from being utilitarian tools into weekend warriors as military-spec watches. Whether it be a broad arrow brandished member of the "Dirty Dozen", a vintage Tudor Submariner used by the Marine Nationale or even a more contemporary Bremont Broadsword, watches that have been and are used by armed forces are just cool. And their robustness, tactility and ability to look great when paired with a camo green textile strap mark them out as the perfect watch to be worn Saturday through Sunday. A while ago, we took a look at Andre's vintage Longines Greenlander, and if you've got the time, it's definitely worth a watch.  To most people, The Dirty Dozen is the prototypical misfit movie, starring the late, great Lee Marvin. But to watch fans, it's something else entirely. In watchland, the Dirty Dozen refers to the 12 suppliers of watch, wrist, waterproof timepieces (the WWW engraving on the caseback) to the British Ministry of Defence during World War II. Some of those suppliers, such as Longines, IWC and Omega, are well-known names today, but others, like Timor, Vertex and Grana, are consigned to those particularly brutal pages of… Read More

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IN-DEPTH: The Longines HydroConquest 41mm in Khaki Green, a value proposition like few others

Right now, the dive watch market is more saturated than a saturation diver's wetsuit. If you want a fit-for-purpose timepiece made to withstand the pressures and perils of H20, you are most definitely spoilt for choice. Of course, it's understandable why watches that aren't going to completely capitulate when coming into contact with water are so popular – it's a very desirable feature. But it can be daunting trying to separate the good from the bad and, more importantly, trying to understand the gulf between the inexpensive and the very expensive. That last point is something that I think about a lot. And matters haven't exactly been simplified since I started wearing this new Longines HydroConquest in Khaki Green. In fact, this watch has well and truly muddied the waters. Here is a timepiece with no less than 300 metres of water resistance, a self-winding movement, ceramic bezel, solid build quality, arresting presentation and it comes from one of the oldest and best watchmakers in the game … and it costs $2325 AUD. Normally with these types of stories, we like to bury the lead somewhat, keeping readers in suspense until the very end. But, in the case of this… Read More

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INTRODUCING: Is this the HydroConquest that Longines had to make?

Longines HydroConquest Green

Need to know Well, I bet nobody saw this coming … another day, another dive watch with a green dial. But is this new Longines HydroConquest a cynical marketing-based exercise aimed at cashing in on the peripheral hype caused by the Rolex Submariner Ref.116610LV? Or has Longines tried to create something truly unique in the space? Well, let's examine the watches. For a start, there's not one but two shades of green available. The first has been designated as "Khaki Green", while the other is what Longines describes as "a brighter green hue" when comparing it to the khaki — think of it as something akin to forest green. The Khaki Green HydroConquest will be made available in both 41mm and 43mm case sizes, while the forest green example will only be available in the 41mm stainless steel case. Both watches will come on either a stainless steel bracelet or matching rubber band. Swapping between these two options will also be a doddle, thanks to an easy to use quick-release function. The Khaki Green example will become a mainstay in the HydroConquest line-up, while the brighter forest green example will be a boutique-only exclusive. As is the case with the rest… Read More

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Why is this Longines Master Collection Annual Calendar so awesome?

Editor's note: Oftentimes, it seems as though the annual calendar complication is all too easily overlooked in the horological hierarchy of complications. GMTs, Chronographs – these are the most popular sorts of watches at the moment. But the annual calendar shouldn't be discounted … because it's wonderful. A while ago, we went HANDS-ON with Longines' Master Collection Annual Calendar, and these were our initial impressions:  There are few things I love more than a watch that surprises me. It's something that doesn't happen near enough for my liking, but it happened with this Longines. It was in the Longines booth at Baselworld, the first day of the fair. Trays and trays of watches had just been laid out in front of us and we were working out what to photograph and focus on. The new Legend Divers, obviously; cool new V.H.P. variants, a really sexy blue and gold Record. Then, the brand representative thrust something from the Master Collection into my hand. Steel, 40mm case, day-date display. Sure, it was nice, but a novelty? Not so much. I made polite sounds of appreciation and handed it back. No, she said, look again. And I did. I noticed the dial text first — 'annual calendar'… Read More

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"Watch & Act!" Auction Item – Lot 4: A classic from the Longines Heritage Collection

Longines Heritage

The Heritage Diver 1967 was released at the first Basel we attended as Time+Tide, so it holds special significance. It was also one of our favourite releases of the year, with its heft, heritage-correct styling and dashing colour scheme, it photographed beautifully and remains a solid submarine option in the truest sense. This watch is generously donated by Swatch Group Australia. Longines have got a lot of things right about this design, particularly on the dial. Sure, the original watch was a bi-compax chronograph with no date, but other than that, the handset is perfect (so '60s), and the indices and dial text are just right too. But the element of the dial that can go unnoticed to the untrained eye is that all three sub-dials are different. This mixes the dial up in a good way, and by having the hour register at six blend into the dial, the design preserves the two-register look of the original. Clever work, Longines. The bracelet, while solid, excellently replicates the sort of thin, folded bracelet you'd find on a vintage piece. And the aluminium bezel, with dominant elapsed minutes and smaller hour indicators, is a rich red, somewhere between oxblood and cherry…. Read More

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