LONGINES TRACE THEIR ORIGINS BACK TO 1832, AND THE VALUES OF TRADITION, ELEGANCE AND PERFORMANCE ARE KEY TO THE BRAND'S IDENTITY AND DESIGN. THIS YEAR, LONGINES ARE CELEBRATING THEIR 185TH ANNIVERSARY WITH THE 'ON THIS DAY' CAMPAIGN - TO FIND OUT WHAT HAPPENED TODAY IN LONGINES' HISTORY CLICK HERE. WE ARE TELLING OUR FAVOURITE LONGINES STORIES TOO, WITH THE 'LONGINES TIME MACHINE' VIDEO SERIES.

VIDEO: Exploring one of the most accessible COSC-certified collections on the market, the new Longines Record range

Accuracy used to be a big deal in watchmaking. There were competitions to test the accuracy of wristwatches. There were complications — additional functions — and engineering improvements designed to assist the watch in keeping true time. There was a space race of sorts to be the most accurate watchmaker in the world. The exploding popularity of the quartz movement in the late ’70s and early ’80s — that uses an electronic oscillator regulated by a quartz crystal to keep time — ended most of that. It was cheap, it was battery powered, and worst of all for mechanical watches, it was so accurate it effectively dropped the mic on the entire topic. However, nearly half a century later, accuracy is once again in focus, as a marketing angle being used to sell watches. Primarily, it is a marker to separate the high-performing movements — those impervious to shock, magnetism, environmental conditions — from the everyday. Rolex have re-set their own standards, with the Superlative Chronometer certification. Omega have worked with the Swiss Federal Institute of Metrology to create an industry-wide certification called METAS. Breitling continue to COSC certify all of their watches. But chronometer certifications in general, as you can tell from the roll call of brands that… Read More

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VIDEO: “We didn’t have it in the museum.” The President of Longines says collector brought GPHG winner to them

It’s the kind of story you could easily gloss over, or embellish, as the president of a large watch company. A collector contacts you with a rare piece. You confirm that it’s original, share the images around the business, get feedback from the heritage team that it might be a good piece to reissue, then conveniently forget — when the accolades roll in — where the story started.   That’s not Walter von Känel’s way. He admits in this interview that the Longines’ GPHG Winner of the ‘Revival Watch Prize’ the Avigation BigEye is, indeed, collector, rather than museum-contributed. “What is interesting is that it has been brought to us by a collector,” Mr von Känel explains. “We didn’t have it in the museum. We checked if it was original and then our heritage team convinced me to re-do it, and it was a good decision. I like it.”  

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VIDEO: A flashback through a year of Longines stories, and one last hurrah in Beijing to launch an aggressively priced new COSC-certified collection

Many brands and many people have taken a chance on Time+Tide since we launched, way back in 2014. One of the greater leaps of faith was earlier this year, when Longines gave us permission to spend time in their archives, and extended a standing invitation to several international events. The aim was to create a year’s worth of stories to celebrate the brand’s 185th anniversary. Well, what feels like only weeks later, I’m dismayed to say that the year has passed. But not without a frankly alarming amount of stories created. In the time since that first phone call we’ve enjoyed quite an itinerary. And we’ve had an immersion in the brand like no other. If you missed any of our ‘Longines Time Machine’ episodes, you can watch them all below, after you’ve had a quick flashback run-through of the new video, which also includes footage from the 185th Anniversary celebration in Beijing, which happened just last week. Special thanks to Amelia and the Longines Australia team for their support over the year, as well as to Longines President Mr Walter von Känel, who endured so many interviews with us that by Beijing he greeted us with a raised eyebrow,… Read More

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VIDEO: Exploring one of the most accessible COSC-certified collections on the market, the new Longines Record range

Accuracy used to be a big deal in watchmaking. There were competitions to test the accuracy of wristwatches. There were complications — additional functions — and engineering improvements designed to assist the watch in keeping true time. There was a space race of sorts to be the most accurate watchmaker in the world. The exploding popularity of the quartz movement in the late ’70s and early ’80s — that uses an electronic oscillator regulated by a quartz crystal to keep time — ended most of that. It was cheap, it was battery powered, and worst of all for mechanical watches, it was so accurate it effectively dropped the mic on the entire topic. However, nearly half a century later, accuracy is once again in focus, as a marketing angle being used to sell watches. Primarily, it is a marker to separate the high-performing movements — those impervious to shock, magnetism, environmental conditions — from the everyday. Rolex have re-set their own standards, with the Superlative Chronometer certification. Omega have worked with the Swiss Federal Institute of Metrology to create an industry-wide certification called METAS. Breitling continue to COSC certify all of their watches. But chronometer certifications in general, as you can tell from the roll call of brands that… Read More

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EVENT: Longines celebrate their 185th anniversary deep in the heart of their biggest market

On Thursday night, Longines celebrated their 185th anniversary in Beijing, China, with a party in the Forbidden City that wrought the brand’s legacy deeply with the history of the Chinese people, taking guests into extraordinary places and spaces. The Forbidden City dates back to the 15th century when it was built as the palace of the Ming emperors of China. It has been a museum since the 1920s and, from now until Sunday, it also plays host to Longines’ 185-year-old history, with an exhibition displaying extremely rare and epochal watches and items that usually reside in the brand’s museum in Saint-Imier, Switzerland. And, rather than being a hugely impressive party trick – to stage an event in such a sacred location – it was, in fact, quite appropriate. It’s a context, and an association, that accurately reflects the 150-year-old connection between the country and the Swiss brand. The first Longines watch arrived in China in 1867. Regular distribution followed shortly after. Now, China is Longines’ biggest market, with the brand enjoying the number one position in the country for its price point and occupying a very large and special part of the President Walter von Känel’s heart. Mr von Känel,… Read More

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VIDEO: The Longines Flagship Heritage 60th Anniversary

The hardest thing when recreating a vintage watch design is knowing when to stop. Some changes — swapping the plexiglass crystal for sapphire, and upgrading the movement — are logical, and others, like an increase in size to more modern dimensions, make sense. But the real art is knowing where to stop, and what to keep. By that measure, the Longines Flagship Heritage 60th Anniversary is a masterpiece in miniature — 38.5mm to be exact. This size is a perfect case in point: it’s an incremental increase that stays true to the spirit of the original in a way that a 40mm watch would not. Then there’s the dial, which would be hard to distinguish from a 1957 model, not least because there’s no unsightly date window to spoil the luminescent combination silver dial and gold tone markers. And while most people will be interested in the steel version, there are also rose and yellow gold versions — full gold, not plate. Longines Flagship Heritage 60th Anniversary Australian pricing and availability Longines Flagship Heritage 60th Anniversary in steel, $2650, limited to 1957 pieces, in yellow or rose gold, $10,350, limited to 60 pieces per version.

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VIDEO: In the Adventurers & Explorers room at the Longines Museum, with a focus on the Lindbergh voyage

The Longines Time Machine, which has been our vehicle of choice for exploring the brand’s long and incredibly varied history in its 185th year, lands here on a story-rich piece of ground. This episode is all about Longines’ efforts to assist some of the great moments in history, including Charles Lindbergh’s first solo transatlantic flight and the first non-stop flight between North America and mainland Europe in 1927, where we lay our scene. The voyage has been commemorated by Longines with an (insanely) limited-edition piece, the Lindbergh Hour Angle Watch 90th Anniversary, which we reviewed here. Buckle up, this is a good ’un.  

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