Omega is one of the greatest names in watchmaking, famous for walking on the moon, keeping time at the Olympics and for gracing the wrist of 007. They’ve been making some of the most robust, accurate and elegant timepieces on the market since 1848. Find out more about the many sides of Omega at Time+Tide.

INSIGHT: Speedmaster, Seamaster, Railmaster – which Omega 1957 Trilogy watch is right for you?

Seeing Omega’s 1957 Trilogy 60th Anniversary boxed set in the metal was one of the highlights of Baselworld this year for Andrew, Andy and myself. Not least because we realised that seeing these three pitch perfect reissues in one place ever again was unlikely, given the astonishing demand. And while getting your hands on the big boxed set (limited to 557 pieces) is a nigh-on-impossible task, we suspect getting one of the Speedmaster, Seamaster or Railmasters limited to 3557 pieces each is more achievable. The only question is, which one do you pick? Read on for what we chose, and why. Andy’s choice – the Speedmaster Why I chose it… Aside from being a genuinely handsome watch, I really like how similar the proportions and details are to the original (having tried on both the original and the modern). I specifically LOVE the size, which at 38.6mm, is so close to the 1957 original (ref CK2915), which was 38mm. We so often see tribute pieces with cases that have been inflated over time, when they just don’t need to be. It’s honestly one of my favourite reissues that I’ve seen over the years. Why you should… In my opinion, it’s perfect for all the… Read More

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WATCHSPOTTING: The story behind the Omega watch that plays a pivotal role in Dunkirk on the wrist of Tom Hardy

*Minor spoiler alert* It’s not unusual for a watch to play a starring role in a movie. Often it’s the prop that shows a countdown in a race against time, or it’s a sentimental object, or an indicator of personal style.  In the rather stupendous Christopher Nolan mega-production that is Dunkirk (I’m still a little woozy on my feet a day after watching it on an IMAX screen), it’s very much the former. Without giving too much away, Tom Hardy’s character, a Spitfire pilot in the Royal Air Force, must use his watch to calculate the amount of fuel he has left when his gauge is smashed by enemy fire. The repeated reference to the watch as the movie hurtles on clearly shows an Omega branded watch, that has been confirmed by an employee at Omega to be the Omega “RAF” 1940, ref CK2129, which was delivered to Great Britain’s ministry of Defence in 1940. Hats off to Christopher Nolan for bothering to research and then source such an authentic watch for the role. Nolan is known for his obsessive attention to detail (read this story about how he made Harry Styles tie his army boots differently to be more true to the era), it’s brilliant… Read More

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HANDS-ON: The Omega Speedmaster Apollo XVII – a tribute to the last man on the moon

The relationship between Omega and space is special. Central to this relationship, of course, is the Speedmaster Professional, a phenomenally popular watch thanks in no small part to the cool-by-association links with NASA and the American space program. Naturally it’s something that Omega hasn’t been shy about capitalising on (even though former President Stephen Urquhart had his reservations), with countless space-themed ad campaigns and limited editions throughout the years. Limited edition Speedmasters are a funny thing: you can guarantee that every year or so Omega will celebrate a mission anniversary, or something similar, and this regularity sometimes makes it hard to get excited about the original premise – this watch helped man land on the moon. The Speedmaster Apollo XVII, a 42mm model available in gold or steel and celebrating the 45th anniversary of that mission (Omega’s third LE celebrating the Apollo XVII) is a little different. Partially, this is because Apollo XVII was the last mission where a man walked on the moon, but more significantly it’s because that man, Captain Eugene ‘Gene’ Cernan, passed away on the 16th of January this year, aged 82. This legacy adds an incredible nostalgia to the watch. This Speedy, with its mission patch inspired… Read More

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INSIGHT: Speedmaster, Seamaster, Railmaster – which Omega 1957 Trilogy watch is right for you?

Seeing Omega’s 1957 Trilogy 60th Anniversary boxed set in the metal was one of the highlights of Baselworld this year for Andrew, Andy and myself. Not least because we realised that seeing these three pitch perfect reissues in one place ever again was unlikely, given the astonishing demand. And while getting your hands on the big boxed set (limited to 557 pieces) is a nigh-on-impossible task, we suspect getting one of the Speedmaster, Seamaster or Railmasters limited to 3557 pieces each is more achievable. The only question is, which one do you pick? Read on for what we chose, and why. Andy’s choice – the Speedmaster Why I chose it… Aside from being a genuinely handsome watch, I really like how similar the proportions and details are to the original (having tried on both the original and the modern). I specifically LOVE the size, which at 38.6mm, is so close to the 1957 original (ref CK2915), which was 38mm. We so often see tribute pieces with cases that have been inflated over time, when they just don’t need to be. It’s honestly one of my favourite reissues that I’ve seen over the years. Why you should… In my opinion, it’s perfect for all the… Read More

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VIDEO: Omega’s Seamaster Aqua Terra 150m gets a meaningful makeover

It’s easy to get distracted by the brightest, shiniest watches of Baselworld; the watches that live up to the marketing parlance of ‘novelties’. But sometimes the real winners are the quiet achievers. I suspect Omega’s redesigned Seamaster Aqua Terra 150m will be one of these winners. The AT (as it’s often called) has long been the go-to casual dress Omega, the obvious choice for those looking for an alternative to the storied Speedmaster or the sporty Seamaster. This year that choice just got easier. The dial has been significantly improved, with less busy text, a new horizontal stripe, and a newly positioned date window at six, giving the whole dial really strong vertical balance, which looks great on the wrist. The changes don’t stop there either – the case (in 41mm and 38mm) has been subtly updated, and the crown has been modified to make it slightly more ergonomic. And of course they’re Master Chronometers, powered by mighty METAS-certified calibres. This particular model comes in at $7250.

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VIDEO: The most important Omega releases from Baselworld 2017

Most of the Basel buzz around Omega has focused on the very excellent (and likely very hard to get) Trilogy limited editions – and rightly so. But these three spot-on reissues represent only a fraction of Omega’s 2017 c0llection, which is jam-packed full of new variants and completely new models appearing across their key collections. Not only do we have new versions of the Speedmaster and a revamped Aqua Terra 150m, but there’s a completely new regular production Railmaster and a particularly bold Planet Ocean that goes by the name of “Big Blue”. In short, there’s something for everybody.

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HANDS-ON: The Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean “Big Blue” lives up to its name

While one of the key trends of Basel 2017 is a move towards more wrist-friendly dive watches (see exhibits A and B), there’s no doubt that big and bold is still the name of the game. Omega’s latest PO, the “Big Blue”, delivers on both fronts, thanks to its whopping 45.5mm wide by 17.8mm high case made from bright blue ceramic. Why Big Blue? Well, asides from the obvious, it’s an homage to a super funky (and super collectable) Omega diver’s chronograph from the ’70s. This Big Blue follows on from last year’s release of the fully ceramic “Deep Black”, itself an evolution of successful ceramic Speedmasters, notably the DSOTM. From all this activity we can deduce that Omega is increasingly serious about integrating ceramic in a big way, well beyond bezels, movement components and the odd limited edition. And why not? If you’ve got the technical know-how and production capacity (like Omega does), you might as well use it. The case and dial of the Big Blue are made from pigmented zirconium oxide powder that’s sintered into an ultra-hard ceramic, then machined with diamond tools and plasma-treated to its final shape. It’s not just the case that’s impressive: the… Read More

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