Omega is one of the greatest names in watchmaking, famous for walking on the moon, keeping time at the Olympics and for gracing the wrist of 007. They’ve been making some of the most robust, accurate and elegant timepieces on the market since 1848. Find out more about the many sides of Omega at Time+Tide.

IN-DEPTH: The Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Master Chronometer

The story in a second: This year the Aqua Terra received a major upgrade, and now we’re seeing Omega’s staple in a whole new light. Since it first surfaced in 2003, Omega’s Aqua Terra has been a versatile everyman, stylish and sartorial, but tough enough for the real world. This year the collection levelled-up to Master Chronometer status and we thought we’d take this sparkly 41mm rubberclad model for a spin. The case The case of the Aqua Terra hasn’t changed too obviously, it’s still the same classic shape, with sporty, swooping, twisted lugs and polished surfaces aplenty. It’s a combination of casual style and dressy finish that helps the Aqua Terra’s chameleon-factor. All models are offered in 38 or 41mm widths, a slight reduction from the previous generation, in line with changing tastes and sized  to please pretty much everyone. One change you might notice is the crown. Omega have flared it ever so slightly, giving it a more conical shape, simply to improve the ergonomics, which was apparently an issue on older versions. I don’t have much personal experience on that front, but I had no issues with this one. The dial The most obvious cosmetic changes have… Read More

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VIDEO: The Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra – is it the only watch you need? 

One of the secrets of the Omega Aqua Terra’s success is its versatile charm. In its dark-dialled and gold incarnations it’s super dressed-up, but put it on a leather or rubber strap and it becomes a much more casual proposition. This is a watch that could pull tuxedo duty or go with board shorts (and the 150 metres of water resistance means it’s safe to take swimming) with equal ease. But no matter how you wear it, you won’t find it boring. The flash of the polished hands and applied indices ensure that, as does the shimmering, patterned dial. And then, of course, there are its more functional charms. It’s now a Master Chronometer-certified watch, which means that it is tough and accurate, and, in the larger size, has a nifty quick jump hour that’s super useful for travellers. Flexible style and feature-packed? That’s why we think the Omega Aqua Terra is one of the best contenders for ‘only watch’ status we’ve seen this year.

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VIDEO: Get ready for summer with the new Omega Aqua Terra on rubber

I didn’t appreciate just how good the new Master Chronometer Omega Aqua Terras were until I spent some proper time with them. And now that I have, I’m kicking myself for not talking more about them at and after Basel. What’s not to like? The design manages to be current and sporty without losing sight of its classic roots, there’s oodles of cool tech under the hood and it looks stellar on the wrist, thanks to all those facets, edges and polished surfaces. But what really won me over was – wait for it – the rubber strap. Yep, Omega have taken a part of a watch that’s usually an afterthought, and elevated it to (almost) an art form. It’s comfortable and functional but, more than that, it’s cool, thanks to the woven print reminiscent of the so-called tropic straps, and the metal end link really helps give this version of the Aqua Terra a sportier edge than its brethren on metal or leather. Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 150M Australian pricing Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 150M, Master Chronometer, on rubber, $7250

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IN-DEPTH: The Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Master Chronometer

The story in a second: This year the Aqua Terra received a major upgrade, and now we’re seeing Omega’s staple in a whole new light. Since it first surfaced in 2003, Omega’s Aqua Terra has been a versatile everyman, stylish and sartorial, but tough enough for the real world. This year the collection levelled-up to Master Chronometer status and we thought we’d take this sparkly 41mm rubberclad model for a spin. The case The case of the Aqua Terra hasn’t changed too obviously, it’s still the same classic shape, with sporty, swooping, twisted lugs and polished surfaces aplenty. It’s a combination of casual style and dressy finish that helps the Aqua Terra’s chameleon-factor. All models are offered in 38 or 41mm widths, a slight reduction from the previous generation, in line with changing tastes and sized  to please pretty much everyone. One change you might notice is the crown. Omega have flared it ever so slightly, giving it a more conical shape, simply to improve the ergonomics, which was apparently an issue on older versions. I don’t have much personal experience on that front, but I had no issues with this one. The dial The most obvious cosmetic changes have… Read More

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RECOMMENDED READING: Omega’s CEO on China and the incredible ‘Building O’

Earlier this week The New York Times published an interview with Omega CEO Raynald Aeschlimann, in which he gives an interesting overview as to how the Swatch Group’s crown jewel is faring, and what the plans are for the future. Aeschlimann points to China as a star performing market at the moment, saying that half of the brand’s business is coming from Asia, where the Constellation is the model of choice. He also speaks about the new factory, the impressive ‘Building O’: “At the center of Building O is a giant glass-enclosed atrium three floors deep, an inventory area called ‘the heart’, with 30,000 stacked boxes of watch parts that are retrieved as needed by a roving automated arm.” Omega projects that this massive 175,225-square-foot building will be big enough for another 30-50 years of growth. Read the full story here.

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INSIGHT: Speedmaster, Seamaster, Railmaster – which Omega 1957 Trilogy watch is right for you?

Seeing Omega’s 1957 Trilogy 60th Anniversary boxed set in the metal was one of the highlights of Baselworld this year for Andrew, Andy and myself. Not least because we realised that seeing these three pitch perfect reissues in one place ever again was unlikely, given the astonishing demand. And while getting your hands on the big boxed set (limited to 557 pieces) is a nigh-on-impossible task, we suspect getting one of the Speedmaster, Seamaster or Railmasters limited to 3557 pieces each is more achievable. The only question is, which one do you pick? Read on for what we chose, and why. Andy’s choice – the Speedmaster Why I chose it… Aside from being a genuinely handsome watch, I really like how similar the proportions and details are to the original (having tried on both the original and the modern). I specifically LOVE the size, which at 38.6mm, is so close to the 1957 original (ref CK2915), which was 38mm. We so often see tribute pieces with cases that have been inflated over time, when they just don’t need to be. It’s honestly one of my favourite reissues that I’ve seen over the years. Why you should… In my opinion, it’s perfect for all the… Read More

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WATCHSPOTTING: The story behind the Omega watch that plays a pivotal role in Dunkirk on the wrist of Tom Hardy

*Minor spoiler alert* It’s not unusual for a watch to play a starring role in a movie. Often it’s the prop that shows a countdown in a race against time, or it’s a sentimental object, or an indicator of personal style.  In the rather stupendous Christopher Nolan mega-production that is Dunkirk (I’m still a little woozy on my feet a day after watching it on an IMAX screen), it’s very much the former. Without giving too much away, Tom Hardy’s character, a Spitfire pilot in the Royal Air Force, must use his watch to calculate the amount of fuel he has left when his gauge is smashed by enemy fire. The repeated reference to the watch as the movie hurtles on clearly shows an Omega branded watch, that has been confirmed by an employee at Omega to be the Omega “RAF” 1940, ref CK2129, which was delivered to Great Britain’s ministry of Defence in 1940. Hats off to Christopher Nolan for bothering to research and then source such an authentic watch for the role. Nolan is known for his obsessive attention to detail (read this story about how he made Harry Styles tie his army boots differently to be more true to the era), it’s brilliant… Read More

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