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LONGINES TRACE THEIR ORIGINS BACK TO 1832, AND THE VALUES OF TRADITION, ELEGANCE AND PERFORMANCE ARE KEY TO THE BRAND'S IDENTITY AND DESIGN. THIS YEAR, LONGINES ARE CELEBRATING THEIR 185TH ANNIVERSARY WITH THE 'ON THIS DAY' CAMPAIGN - TO FIND OUT WHAT HAPPENED TODAY IN LONGINES' HISTORY CLICK HERE. WE ARE TELLING OUR FAVOURITE LONGINES STORIES TOO, WITH THE 'LONGINES TIME MACHINE' VIDEO SERIES.

HANDS-ON: The large, and very, very limited Longines Lindbergh Hour Angle Watch 90th Anniversary

This post is served with an almighty fist pump, because just like our crystal ball ‘predicted’, Longines has announced a 90th Anniversary version of the Lindbergh Hour Angle, a few months ahead of the anniversary celebration. Longines has still managed to pull out a major surprise though. The steel and titanium watch will be limited to just 90 pieces. The hour referenced in the name of the model will be about as long as it takes for the model to sell out. The original ‘hour angle’ watch was designed in a partnership between Charles Lindbergh and Longines following his 33-hour flight from Roosevelt Airport to Le Bourghet, outside Paris. The historic feat was timed by Longines, who were official timekeeper for the World Air Sports Federation. Lindbergh had some ideas about how to determine longitude during long-distance flights using a rotating bezel to allow for the correction of the equation of time and a rotating centre dial that allows for synchronization to the second. The resulting watch, which has had several reissues over the years, indicates the hour angle in degrees and in minutes of arc in addition to indicating hours, minutes and seconds. Pilots and navigators have used the hour… Read More

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HANDS-ON: The Longines Heritage 1945

One of the highlights on our Baselworld calendar is seeing what heritage re-release Longines has cooked up, and whoo boy, have they pulled out all the stops in 2017 or what. You’re looking at the Heritage 1945, an absolutely on point interpretation of a mid-century dress watch. Based on a 1945 design called the Calatrava by collectors, this watch does everything right. Funnily enough it’s the exact watch that Sunflowerman illustrated as part of the Watercolour Watch project back in 2015. The 40mm steel case is simple, and not overly fussy, with a flat bezel just the right width and a slender-yet-functional crown. The mid-tan nubuck strap with single line of reinforcing stitching in contrasting thread walks a perfectly straight line between dress and casual. The real star is the dial. For such a minimal layout, Longines has packed it full of sexy detail. First of all there’s the vintage velvet effect of the brushed copper-tone convex dial, then there’s the alternating steel-tone applied hours markers and printed mid-century Arabic numerals, all of which contrasts with the long, elegant leaf hands in blued steel. The small seconds subdial has a concentric circular finish, just to keep things interesting. Oh, and… Read More

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INTRODUCING: The Longines Conquest VHP – very precise, very cool

We don’t talk much about quartz here at Time+Tide, and that’s usually for a good reason. Most quartz watches are pretty boring. There are, however, some exceptional quartz technologies out there, and the just-announced Longines Conquest VHP is a great example of this. VHP stands for Very High Precision and it is, believe it or not, a reissue of a model originally released in 1984, when ultra-accurate quartz represented one of the watch world’s great frontiers. As you’d expect from a watch with precision in the name (albeit in acronym form), accuracy is a key feature. The Conquest VHP boasts a deviation of +5/-5 seconds a year, compared to an accuracy range of some 25 seconds per month for regular watches. These impressive figures are due to a movement developed by ETA exclusively for Longines, which offers a host of features absent from your typical quartz, including thermo-compensation, five-year battery and a gear position system designed to help the hands re-align in case of shocks or magnetic displacement. Aside from the impressive tech specs, the Conquest VHP line looks handsome too – offered in three-hand/calendar and chronograph options, in an array of sizes and blue, black silvered or carbon fibre dials. Not bad, Longines, not… Read More

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HANDS-ON: The large, and very, very limited Longines Lindbergh Hour Angle Watch 90th Anniversary

This post is served with an almighty fist pump, because just like our crystal ball ‘predicted’, Longines has announced a 90th Anniversary version of the Lindbergh Hour Angle, a few months ahead of the anniversary celebration. Longines has still managed to pull out a major surprise though. The steel and titanium watch will be limited to just 90 pieces. The hour referenced in the name of the model will be about as long as it takes for the model to sell out. The original ‘hour angle’ watch was designed in a partnership between Charles Lindbergh and Longines following his 33-hour flight from Roosevelt Airport to Le Bourghet, outside Paris. The historic feat was timed by Longines, who were official timekeeper for the World Air Sports Federation. Lindbergh had some ideas about how to determine longitude during long-distance flights using a rotating bezel to allow for the correction of the equation of time and a rotating centre dial that allows for synchronization to the second. The resulting watch, which has had several reissues over the years, indicates the hour angle in degrees and in minutes of arc in addition to indicating hours, minutes and seconds. Pilots and navigators have used the hour… Read More

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EXCLUSIVE: Get excited, Longines to work with Time+Tide on year-long access-all-areas video project called The Longines Time Machine!

Dust off your fedora Indiana, we’re going into the archives… Longines is a brand whose history the Time+Tide team has delved into before – pretty much every time they release an often best-in-show heritage reissue –  and frankly, we haven’t been able to get enough. That’s because, while Longines has one of the most impressive archives of watches in existence, as well as countless accolades for timekeeping achievements, the brand has always kept relatively quiet about it. That all changed in January with the announcement of the ‘On This Day’ campaign over at longines.com – which was around the same time we became involved. How? Well, we’ll be choosing our ‘best of’ from each month of memories and wrapping them into short videos that tell the story. In Episode 1, we set the scene at Saint-Imier in 1832…

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HANDS-ON: The Longines Legend Diver lives up to its name

Longines was making stellar heritage reissues well before it was cool. Case in point is the stylish ’60s-inspired Legend Diver, first released way back in 2007. And while it’s become de rigueur for most major brands to release one or two retro pieces a year, the Longines Legend Diver (LLD) pioneered the reissue genre, and still holds its own, thanks to a well-balanced trifecta of timeless good looks, clear vintage style and cracking value. First off, let’s tackle the style. The internal rotating bezel and twin crowns of the Legend draw their inspiration from a type of dive watch that was popular in the ’60s and ’70s called the Super Compressor. Most dive watches rely on thick cases, crystals and gaskets to create an impermeable wall to keep moisture out. The Super Compressor’s approach however, was slightly different. Developed by case-maker E. Piquerez SA (EPSA), it relied on the external pressure of the water to aid the water resistance of the watch – the deeper you went, the tighter the seal. It’s a clever system and was widely used by a range of watchmakers from the ’50s through to the ’70s – with notable examples including Jaeger-LeCoultre, IWC, Hamilton and of course, Longines. A… Read More

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HANDS-ON: All aboard with the Longines Railroad

We’re not alone in our love of Longines heritage offerings – the classic designs and smart prices make them consistently instant hits among watch enthusiasts, and every year we get some new treasure from the brand’s seemingly endless archive. We’ve had dive watches, pilot’s watches, even trench watches – but we’ve never seen a train watch, until now… The American railroads ‘General Railroad Timepiece Standards’ specified that timekeeping equipment from then on must “be open faced…use plain Arabic numbers printed bold and black on a white dial, and have bold black hands…” The Longines Railroad takes its name and design from highly precise ‘railroad grade’ mid-twentieth century Longines watches intended for use by railway workers. Before the invention of electronic safety mechanisms, accuracy on the railways wasn’t just a matter of good customer service, it was a matter of life and death. In fact, it was a head-on collision in 1891 caused by a slow pocketwatch that caused the American railroads to put together the General Railroad Timepiece Standards. These guidelines specified that timekeeping equipment from then on must “be open faced… have a minimum of 17 jewels, adjusted to at least 5 positions, keep time accurately to within a gain or loss of only… Read More

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